UW’s Korea Studies Program renamed to honor Paull Shin

SEATTLE — Seven years ago, faculty at the University of Washington voted to rename its Korea Studies Program in honor of then-state Sen. Paull Shin because of his unwavering commitment to its development.

But the Edmonds Democrat asked them to wait until he was out of office.

He left in January and UW faculty on Thursday made the program’s new name official.

“What a blessing that is. I really appreciate it,” Shin said before he and family members attended a renaming ceremony at the university. “I am so honored to be recognized in this way.”

Shin, a onetime chairman of the Senate Higher Education Committee, worked tirelessly to promote the Korea Studies Program housed in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.

He talked up the program in trips to South Korea, where he would meet with business and education leaders. He passed legislation in Olympia that boosted instruction about the language and culture of Korea and other Asian nations.

And he helped corral funding for the Korea Studies Program as well. Through the years, his contributions and those he helped round up totaled nearly $4 million, according to information compiled by center officials.

Shin was a street orphan during the Korean War and was adopted by Ray Paull, a U.S. Army officer.

In the U.S., he received a GED and eventually a doctorate from the University of Washington and taught for 31 years in Washington’s higher education system. His career included teaching Asian Studies at the UW.

Shin was Washington’s first Korean-American legislator when he was elected to the state House of Representatives in 1992. He won a Senate seat in 1998 and was in his fourth term when he resigned in January, after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Claire Swander, 6 months old, gets an H1N1 vaccine from nurse Soon Ku at Providence Physician Group in Mill Creek on Oct. 31, 2009. The site had lines with a three-hour wait for portions of the morning. (Heidi Hoffman / Herald file)
Vaccine approval for kids a reminder of 2009 H1N1 outbreak

As swine flu scare closed some schools, parents flocked to public clinics to protect their children.

Darren Redick is the new CEO of Providence’s Northwest Washington service area. (Providence Health and Services) 20210514
Providence stays local in selecting a new regional CEO

Based in Everett, Darren Redick will lead the health care provider’s Northwest Washington area.

E-bikes are booming, whether or not we’re ready

Sales have spiked the past several years. In Snohomish County, they’re expected to gain popularity.

Both Snohomish County E. coli cases linked to PCC yogurt

If you have any Pure Eire Dairy yogurt at home, throw it away, state health experts said.

Two men were hurt after a fire in an apartment Sunday morning south of Everett. (South County Fire) 210516
Two men hurt in apartment fire south of Everett

In all, 16 residents were displaced by the early morning blaze at the Hanger 128 Apartments.

Firefighters douse the flames at the NOAA Fisheries Building Friday evening in Mukilteo on May 14, 2021.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Fire damages NOAA site near new ferry terminal in Mukilteo

Smoke flooded the waterfront Friday night as fire crews descended on the abandoned research center.

Everett man shot while walking his dog identified

Ryan S. McFadden, 33, died of gunshot wounds.

Dr Chris Spitters (center), Interim Health Officer, makes makes his address Monday evening during a Special Meeting of the Snohomish Health District Board of Health at the Administration Builiding in Everett on March 2, 2020.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Fueled by vaccines, a return to normal is getting closer

Fully vaccinated Washingtonians can enjoy a renewed sense of freedom, public health experts say.

Inslee signs ambitious environmental protection laws

The bills included the Climate Commitment Act, environmental justice legislation and a clean fuels standard.

Most Read