Commentary: Everett Central Lions Club marks 100th year

The service club, the first in the Northwest, continues its vital service work locally and globally.

By Victor C. Harris / For The Herald

One hundred years ago on May 20, 1920, 37 service-minded men started Everett Central Lions Club. This was only the 79th Lions Club in the U.S. and the first club in the Northwest. (Today, there are over 48,000 clubs) The man spearheading the new club was an leader who will be remembered. His name was Lew V. Day, manager of Everett’s Penney’s store. In 1925 he was selected to become company vice president in New York.

Today, Everett Central Lions Club is still serving the community and always looking for men and women who want to help. We serve with projects that include fighting hunger, rewarding community service, supporting youth programs, providing disaster relief, encouraging children’s reading, park development and of course, vision causes.

You may also know us as the organization that collects used eyeglasses. Lions were challenged to be the “Knight’s Of The Blind” by Helen Keller in her crusade against darkness. She became Lions’ first woman member.

As Everett Central Lions begins another 100 years of community service we thank the public for support. Lions Clubs International has grown to become the world’s largest service organization and Everett Central Lions Club will continue to grow in purpose and committment to serve.

The Lions motto is WE SERVE. The pandemic forced us to move our 100th anniversary celebration and the visit of our international president, Dr. Jung-Yul Choi to Nov. 7. For more information about Everett Central Lions contact Art Ruben at since1965@aol.com.

Victor C. Harris is president of the Everett Central Lions Club.

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