Erika Jones, makeup artist at The Refinery Salon In Edmonds, gives Julie Wiese a makeover during the first YWCA Seattle King Snohomish RISE Career Training Workshop for women Aug. 22 in Edmonds. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

Erika Jones, makeup artist at The Refinery Salon In Edmonds, gives Julie Wiese a makeover during the first YWCA Seattle King Snohomish RISE Career Training Workshop for women Aug. 22 in Edmonds. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

Career event helps women ‘refresh, inspire, support, empower’

The local YWCA held its first training workshop last month in Edmonds.

EDMONDS — Shirley Abreu’s job search never ends.

“I’m always job hunting. I’m an independent contractor,” said the self-employed corporate travel director.

The Edmonds resident recently got some help with her unceasing job search at the recent RISE Career Training Workshop for women, a first for its sponsor, the YWCA Seattle King Snohomish.

The workshop, held at the Edmonds Center for the Arts, offered job-seekers the opportunity to create a LinkedIn page, fine-tune a resume or spend 20 minutes with a career coach.

“RISE stands for refresh, inspire, support, empower,” said Annalee Schafranek, YWCA’s public relations and marketing manager.

Abreu took advantage of a group of volunteers offering free head shots.

“I got a new haircut, and I need a new photo to update my LinkedIn page,” she said.

Alicia Crank, the YWCA’s corporate relations officer, organized the event.

“All the volunteers are women from the Edmonds business community,” Crank said. “It was an easy ask. It was a way to give back and help their neighbors.”

Crank is also a member of the Snohomish County Airport Commission, a volunteer advisory group to the county executive.

Workshop volunteers included Jenny Anttila, an interview coach experienced in conducting executive searches; Kristen Cline, an accountant and resume coach; and Elizabeth Lambert,Sarah Sewalelot and Erika Jones, stylists and make-up experts at The Refinery Salon in Edmonds.

Mary Anne Dillon, executive director of the YWCA Snohomish branch, showcases the nonprofit’s Working Wardrobe program, which offers free business attire to homeless or low-income women. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

Mary Anne Dillon, executive director of the YWCA Snohomish branch, showcases the nonprofit’s Working Wardrobe program, which offers free business attire to homeless or low-income women. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

“As a young woman I didn’t know how to write a resume or how to interview,” Sewalelot said. “This is a resource.”

The workshop, held Aug. 22, coincided with and recognized Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, Schafranek said.

“Equal Pay Day is the symbolic day when women’s earnings ‘catch up’ to men’s earnings from the previous year,” said Schafranek, citing an American Association of University Women report.

“It takes black women 20 months to earn what a white male earns in one year,” Schafranek said.

White and Asian women fare better, earning the equivalent in 15 to 16 months, the association said.

Volunteers from Sno-Isle Libraries included Emily Felt, lead librarian for business services.

The library offers a find-a-job page and a Resume Lab with “real, live writing experts” who can review your resume or cover letter within one business day, Felt said.

Mary Anne Dillon, executive director of the YWCA Snohomish branch, and Kizha Davidson, its chief communications officer, showcased the group’s Everett clothing bank. The Working Wardrobe program offers free, business-appropriate attire to homeless or low-income women who need clothing for an interview or job, Dillon said.

The YWCA hopes to offer more career training workshops for women locally.

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Overall property value increases 5.5% in Snohomish County

In the assessor’s annual accounting, Lakewood School District residents saw the biggest average uptick: 8.1%.

FAA concludes three days of test flights of Boeing’s 737 Max

Multiple steps remain before the plane can get the green light to carry passengers again.

COVID-19 and CHOP could benefit Snohomish County real estate

An estimated 40% to 55% of work formerly performed in an office building will be done remotely by 2025.

Somers: There are no current plans to move back to Phase 1

Such a decision would require a significant, sustained spike in hospitalizations and deaths, he says.

Alaska Airlines could ban non-masked flyers from travel

Noncompliant passengers will be told it is their “final notice” and a written report will be made.

Report: Boeing fell short in disclosing key changes to Max

Engineers did not know how powerfully the flight-control system could push the plane’s nose down.

Norwegian scraps $10.6 billion deal for Boeing Max, 787 jets

The decision covers 92 of Boeing’s Max narrow-body planes and five of the long-distance Dreamliners.

Re-certification flights begin in Seattle for Boeing 737 Max

The tests will evaluate the proposed changes to the plane’s automated flight control system.

Report: Virus could slow Canadian shopping in Washington

Concerns about public health and safety could continue to inhibit Canadians from shopping in the U.S.

Flight tests of grounded 737 Max planned to begin Monday

Such tests are one of the final stages by the government before it certifies an aircraft.

Fishers now qualify for federal loan amid economic downturn

The rule change comes after captains discovered crew members weren’t included in the 1st aid program.

Boeing starts 777-X test flights in Moses Lake

Test operations are based in Everett and there is no plan to “overnight at Grant County International.”