Boeing Co. 737 Max planes are seen at the company’s manufacturing facility in Renton, Wash., in March 2019. (David Ryder/Bloomberg)

Boeing Co. 737 Max planes are seen at the company’s manufacturing facility in Renton, Wash., in March 2019. (David Ryder/Bloomberg)

Lawmakers rip FAA for not disclosing documents on Boeing Max

A senator said the FAA hasn’t to respond to more than half of his committee’s requests for documents.

By David Koenig / Associated Press

The chairman of a Senate committee accused the Federal Aviation Administration of stonewalling lawmakers’ attempts to understand how the agency approved a Boeing jet that later suffered two deadly crashes and whether the FAA retaliates against whistle blowers in its ranks.

Roger Wicker, a Republican senator from Mississippi, said Wednesday that the FAA has failed to respond to more than half of his committee’s requests for documents, some of them made more than a year ago. The FAA hasn’t turned over anything since April, he said.

Wicker said he holds Stephen Dickson, President Donald Trump’s pick to lead the FAA, personally responsible for creating an adversarial relationship with Congress.

“It is hard not to conclude your team at the FAA has deliberately attempted to keep us in the dark,” Wicker told Dickson during a hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee.

Dickson disputed Wicker’s description of the FAA, but he promised “to redouble our efforts” to cooperate with Congress.

The committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington — where Boeing builds the long-grounded 737 Max — joined Wicker in criticizing FAA’s failure to turn over documents. Other Democrats accused FAA of having a culture of secrecy.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, pressed Dickson on whether Boeing lied to the FAA about safety concerns around the Boeing plane. Dickson avoided answering directly whether the Chicago manufacturer lied but agreed that the certification process was flawed.

“The manufacturer made mistakes, and the FAA made mistakes in its oversight of the manufacturer,” Dickson said.

This week, Wicker and Cantwell introduced legislation to revamp the FAA’s process for certifying new passenger planes. The bill would not eliminate FAA’s decades-long policy of relying on employees of aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing to test and analyze safety of key systems, but it would change it. For example, the bill would require FAA — not the companies — to pick those insiders and monitor them more closely.

Dickson said changing who selects company insiders to do safety work “is not something that I believe would add to the safety of the process.” He noted that so-called designees already must meet FAA qualifications and are overseen by FAA inspectors. “It is a trust but verify system,” he said.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., fired back, “The FAA has to do the work, not just oversee it.”

The FAA lets about 80 manufacturers use their own engineers, called designees, to certify safety of their planes.

FAA officials and some lawmakers say that practice is necessary and even beneficial because of the expertise of the insiders and FAA’s limited budget. Last year, FAA’s leader at the time estimated it would cost nearly $2 billion a year for FAA to perform all the work now done by manufacturers.

However, the “organization designation authorization” program, or ODA, was heavily criticized after it was disclosed that FAA officials had little understanding of a key flight-control system on the Boeing Max that has been implicated in crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. The 346 people killed in those crashes combined came from many countries, including the United States.

The father of one of the victims was scheduled to testify before the Senate panel later Wednesday. While Dickson spoke, someone stood behind him and held a poster with photos of victims of the Max crash in Ethiopia.

The Max has been grounded worldwide since March 2019. Boeing hopes to win FAA approval this year for changes it is making to the plane so airlines can resume using it. Dickson said, as he has many times, that FAA will approve Boeing’s work when it is convinced the plane is safe.

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