A Boeing 737 Max jet heads to a landing, past other grounded jets at Boeing Field following a test flight Monday in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

A Boeing 737 Max jet heads to a landing, past other grounded jets at Boeing Field following a test flight Monday in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Re-certification flights begin in Seattle for Boeing 737 Max

The tests will evaluate the proposed changes to the plane’s automated flight control system.

Associated Press

SEATTLE — A Boeing 737 Max took off from a Seattle airport on Monday, the start of three days of re-certification test flights that mark a step toward returning the aircraft to passenger service.

The Federal Aviation Administration test flights over the next three days will evaluate Boeing’s proposed changes to the automated flight control system on the Max. This is the software called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) that activated erroneously on two flights that crashed, killing 346 people. Since the second accident in March 2019, the jet has been grounded.

The Seattle Times reports the plane flew east and landed one hour and 20 minutes later at Moses Lake and returned to Boeing Field early in the afternoon.

Boeing has over the past year made multiple changes to its plans for updating the airplane’s systems. The start of these re-certification flights indicates that Boeing has finalized its changes and turned them in to the FAA.

The test flights will enable the FAA to evaluate the finalized upgrade to MCAS as its pilots perform a wide array of flight maneuvers and emergency procedures to assess whether the changes meet FAA certification standards.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

‘Voice of Everett’ receives Herald’s top Emerging Leader award

Julio Cortes, 34, brings ‘passion and fearlessness to uplift our community.’

FAA probing Boeing’s alleged pressure on designated inspectors

A federal criminal probe has also been opened against the company in the wake of 2 fatal crashes.

She teaches the traditional language of Coast Salish tribes

Natosha Gobin is spreading her passion for Lushootseed to tribal and non-tribal students.

‘I want to live and raise a family where everyone has a home’

Alexander Lark once built nest boxes for ducks. Now he raises money for Housing Hope and its families.

She knows the transformative power of education

Ambar Martinez also knows first hand the challenge of acclimation for people of diverse backgrounds.

He helps veterans achieve their educational and career goals

Chester Curtis helped raise money to open a center that serves veterans and their families.

He wants to ‘leave my community better than I found it’

WSU Everett spokesman Randy Bolerjack has a message for all students: Help your community thrive.

She’s making sure young people don’t feel lost or left out

Through her tireless efforts, Nicole Amor connects people with needed programs and services.

A ‘mother interested in helping kids’ hopes to end stereotypes

Edmonds activist and consultant Courtney Wooten advocates for children throughout Snohomish County.

Most Read