The 2020 Cadillac CT4 has standard rear-wheel drive, with all-wheel drive available on all but one model. (Manufacturer photo)

The 2020 Cadillac CT4 has standard rear-wheel drive, with all-wheel drive available on all but one model. (Manufacturer photo)

2020 Cadillac CT4 has elegant looks, animated performance

This luxury compact sedan is all new, and it offers a choice between two turbocharged engines.

Cadillac has a tempting new compact sedan on its 2020 roster: the CT4.

The CT4 is elegantly styled, equipped for spirited driving, and well priced. There are four trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury, Sport, and V-Series. Rear-wheel drive is standard for every model, and all-wheel drive is available as an option on all but the Luxury trim.

A 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine joined to an eight-speed automatic transmission is standard in the Luxury, Premium Luxury, and Sport models. It creates 237 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque. With rear-wheel drive the EPA fuel economy rating is 23 mpg city, 34 mpg highway, and 27 mpg combined. With AWD the numbers are 23/32/26 mpg.

A 2.7-liter turbo four-cylinder powers the V-Series with 325 horsepower and 380 lb-ft of torque. This engine is optional in the Premium Luxury model, but note that in this placement the horsepower rating is 310 and torque is 350. In both cases a 10-speed automatic transmission is standard. Fuel economy numbers for rear-drive models are 20/30/24 mpg, and for AWD they are 20/28/23 mpg.

Base pricing is $33,990 for the Luxury trim; $38,490 for the Premium Luxury; $39,590 for the Sport; and $45,490 for the V-Series.

I drove a CT4 Premium Luxury model equipped with the 2.7-liter engine and all-wheel drive. The bigger engine and 10-speed transmission add $2,500 to the bottom line, and AWD adds $2,000.

An infotainment system with 8-inch display is standard on every 2020 Cadillac CT4. The Premium Luxury model’s interior is shown here. (Manufacturer photo)

An infotainment system with 8-inch display is standard on every 2020 Cadillac CT4. The Premium Luxury model’s interior is shown here. (Manufacturer photo)

Some of the standard features on my tester are an infotainment system with 8-inch touchscreen display, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay capability, SiriusXM satellite radio, eight-way power adjustable driver’s seat with lumbar, and a safety group with forward collision alert, front pedestrian braking, HD rear camera, and rear park assist.

Seven options on the tester (totalling $7,275) range from $600 for upgraded 18-inch wheels to $1,700 for a navigation and Bose premium audio system package with wireless phone charging. In-between are assorted packages for indulging in extreme climate-related comfort for the seats, and technologies to help drivers stay in their lane and avoid collisions.

It’s a nicely configured system for giving CT4 buyers more flexibility. My tester topped the 50-grand frontier, which doesn’t exactly fit the well-priced description at the beginning of this report. But the options list is easily shaved down to keep pricing under control, and then there’s the Luxury model to consider. It’s well equipped unto itself.

CT4’s infotainment system is easy to use and includes the all-important volume and tuning dials in addition to touchscreen operation.

The compact interior doesn’t offer a lot of legroom for rear-seat passengers. If that’s a priority for you, check out the 2020 Cadillac CT5, another all-new compact sedan. It has 37.9 inches of rear seat legroom compared to the CT4’s 33.4 inches.

With the 2.7-liter engine, the CT4 is quite the animated performer, an emoter really. Yet it still delivers a pleasantly smooth and quiet ride. I haven’t driven a CT4 with the 2.0-liter, but my safe guess is that it harbors more than enough vigor for most drivers.

The 2020 Cadillac CT4 has seating for five passengers. Cargo space in the trunk is 10.7 cubic feet. (Manufacturer photo)

The 2020 Cadillac CT4 has seating for five passengers. Cargo space in the trunk is 10.7 cubic feet. (Manufacturer photo)

2020 CADILLAC CT4 PREMIUM LUXURY 2.7L AWD

Base price, including destination charge: $38,490

Price as driven: $50,265

Mary Lowry is an independent automotive writer who lives in Snohomish County. She is a member of the Motor Press Guild, and a member and past president of the Northwest Automotive Press Association. Vehicles are provided by the manufacturers as a one-week loan for review purposes only. In no way do the manufacturers control the content of the reviews.

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