Arlington School Board to consider third try for school bond

The option that gained the most traction was a trimmed down $96 million measure.

By Douglas Buell

Arlington Times

ARLINGTON – An Arlington Public Schools construction bond measure that failed in the general election last month could return for a third try with voters in February, scaled down and with a smaller price tag.

The bond issue failed in the November election with 52 percent of 14,654 votes cast – well below the 60 percent supermajority required by state law. Voter turnout was a whopping 69 percent.

“It didn’t reach the supermajority, but we still had the majority of voters and made ground in gaining more ‘yes’ voters,” said Brian Lewis, executive director of operations.

It was a tough road for school bonds across the state, with most showing results similar to Arlington. With all ballots counted, five bonds passed out of 13.

Among five capital project levies on the ballot, four of them passed with over 50 percent “yes” votes.

School Board members were presented Monday with recommendations from the facilities advisory committee.

The option that gained the most traction was a trimmed-down $96 million measure, $11.5 million less than the previous bond, which would still qualify the district for $11.4 million in state matching funds, leaving $4.6 million in projects that would go unfunded.

The measure would move ahead with replacing Post Middle School, a new wing and technology and arts workshop at Arlington High School, security cameras, door locks and environmental control improvements, flooring at Eagle Creek and Kent Prairie elementaries, boiler replacement and other work. Lewis said the main projects that would not be included are the security lobbies at every building, audio improvements in the classrooms, field drainage and improvements at the bus station.

State matching funds would not be used for a fifth elementary school, Lewis said.

Taxpayers who now pay $1.37 per $1,000 in assessed property value toward Arlington school bonds would seen an increase to $1.42 starting in 2020 and stay at that level until 2040. For a $350,000 home, the amount translates to $497 a year, $17 more than the current year.

A second option the committee brought forward was a $75.5 million bond issue to proceed with Post Middle School replacement only.

Lewis said the district would look for other ways and funding sources to complete other projects over time.

If the district wants to put the bond on the Feb. 12 ballot, Dec. 10 is the last meeting date to adopt a resolution. Other options further out include a special election on April 23 and general election next November, Lewis said. Feb. 11, 2020 would be the first opportunity to renew the district’s levy for educational programs and operations.

This story originally appeared in The Arlington Times, a sibling paper of The Daily Herald.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Sid Logan (left) and Rob Toyer
PUD candidates focus on rates, broadband and renewables

Incumbent Sidney Logan faces former Marysville City Council member Rob Toyer for the District 1 seat.

Motorcycle rider dies after collision with car near Stanwood

The investigation of the fatal crash on Pioneer Highway closed stretches of it to drivers.

Deputies search for suspect after shooting south of Everett

One man was transported to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries. A shooter reportedly fled.

Bill Bruch (left ) and Dave Paul
First-term Dem faces a GOP challenger for House seat in 10th

Rep. Dave Paul and Bill Bruch differ widely on the response to COVID-19.

Ballot drop box in Mill Creek hit by truck

The box was damaged Friday. Ballots inside will be counted. Officials gave other dropoff options.

FILE - In this July 31, 2015 file photo, an orca leaps out of the water near a whale watching boat in the Salish Sea in the San Juan Islands, Wash. Habitat protections for an endangered population of orcas would be greatly expanded under a proposal to be advanced by NOAA Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Millions have been spent on orca recovery: Is it working?

Restoring destroyed salmon habitat is the key to regaining Southern Resident killer whale numbers.

This firetruck serves the South County Fire District. (City of Lynnwood)
Two fire districts want to change how they make money

South County Fire wants to do a benefit charge, while Sky Valley Fire looks for a levy lid lift.

Sawyer West was last seen Oct. 16 at Highway 99 and 220th Street Southwest in Lynnwood. (Courtesy Carol Crane)
Search continues for missing man last seen in Lynnwood

Family, friends and police ask that people keep an eye out for Sawyer West, who has schizophrenia.

Most Read