At first Dylan Beakley (center) was a reluctant cadet at the Washington Youth Academy where he was eager to make up lost high school credits. He later became a leader and gave a commencement speech at graduation earlier this year. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Youth Academy)

At first Dylan Beakley (center) was a reluctant cadet at the Washington Youth Academy where he was eager to make up lost high school credits. He later became a leader and gave a commencement speech at graduation earlier this year. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Youth Academy)

Hopelessly behind on credits, he was an unlikely graduate

Through four schools and a military academy, an Arlington teen overcame grief and earned a diploma.

ARLINGTON — He didn’t deliver just one graduation speech.

He did two — the first in January, the second a week ago.

Not bad for a guy whose grades going into his senior year were south of a C average.

Dylan Beakley is grateful for second chances, timely advice and those who had faith in him when he did not.

He could have become one of the roughly 9,400 Washington students who drop out of high school between their freshman and senior years.

Sometimes he was distracted, sometimes depressed, at times reckless and certainly overwhelmed. He attended four high schools and spent another six months as a cadet at the Washington Youth Academy. Perhaps his most important lessons weren’t academic, but about building resolve.

“I want people to understand that no matter where you came from, you can always make a change,” he said.

Dylan Beakley spent nearly six months at the Washington Youth Academy, where he caught up on lost credits and learned leadership skills. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

Dylan Beakley spent nearly six months at the Washington Youth Academy, where he caught up on lost credits and learned leadership skills. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

That idea led him back to Marysville Middle School a week ago, two days after he graduated from Weston High School in Arlington. Beakley and Nathan Weier, a fellow Youth Academy and Weston graduate, met with two students who reminded them of themselves six years earlier.

Beakley and Weier explained to the boys that people doubted they would ever graduate. They described where the boys were likely to mess up in life and how they need to push through it. Then they brought out their diplomas and told them this is worth fighting for.

“They are good kids,” Beakley said afterward. “They are just lost. I was lost, too.”

Falling behind

She always treated him with kindness when they were in middle school.

Their friendship was platonic. He never had the nerve to tell her how he really felt.

They went their separate ways for high school: he east up the hill to Marysville Getchell; she north to Marysville Pilchuck.

Her bus would stop at Getchell on the way to Pilchuck. He would sometimes catch up with her in those fleeting moments.

The day he learned about the fatal shootings in the Pilchuck cafeteria, Beakley texted his friend to see if she was okay.

That afternoon he learned that Gia Soriano was among the victims.

He remembers the shooter, too. They had wrestled in middle school.

Nothing made sense.

Like many Marysville students, he felt in a fog, not for days but for weeks and months. He often thought of Gia. He didn’t go to school for more than a week. When he did return, it was as though he wasn’t there at all.

He failed classes and didn’t care.

Dylan Beakley graduated from both the Washington Youth Academy as well as Arlington’s Weston High School this year. Far behind on credits, he caught up his senior year and graduated on time. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

Dylan Beakley graduated from both the Washington Youth Academy as well as Arlington’s Weston High School this year. Far behind on credits, he caught up his senior year and graduated on time. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

The one thing that kept him going was basketball. He made the freshman squad after having been cut in middle school. He was neither a starter nor a star, but it felt good to be part of the team.

By the end of the school year, Beakley knew he needed a change.

He transferred to Marysville Pilchuck. There were times he could have sworn he saw Gia on campus, and then he would seek out a counselor.

He was glad to make the C basketball team and to be a Tomahawk, but his grades needed monitoring to determine if he would be eligible for games. After the season, they slid.

His family moved to Arlington. He once again would start anew.

By then, he said he was drinking, smoking weed and staying out late.

He tried out for the Arlington High School team his junior year. He remembers telling his father, “It’s the only thing that keeps me from doing stupid crap, Dad.”

Beakley was the last player on the end of the bench for the junior varsity. Many games he wouldn’t play. None of that mattered. He was just proud to wear a capital A on his chest.

As had become his pattern, his grades took a nosedive after the season.

A counselor called him in. It was time for a talk.

Cherry on the sundae

As Beakley remembers it, the counselor explained how far behind in credits he’d fallen, handed him a brochure and said something to the effect of “You should consider this.”

The first thing he saw was that he could earn eight credits. That was enticing.

Then again, it was the Bremerton-based Washington Youth Academy, and that would require commitment, conformity and separation from friends and family.

In promotional material, the academy writes that its mission is to provide a disciplined, safe and professional learning environment where at-risk youth can improve their educational levels and employment potential and become responsible and productive. Part of that goal is to provide “life and job skills training that will change their lives and give them hope and opportunity.”

Dylan Beakley spent nearly six months at the Washington Youth Academy. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

Dylan Beakley spent nearly six months at the Washington Youth Academy. (Photo courtesy of Washington Youth Academy)

Beakley wasn’t thinking about life changes. He just wanted the credits.

“On orientation day, I get there and I see all these guys in military uniforms and I’m like ‘Oh, what did I sign up for?’ ”

During a gruelling workout, he thought to himself: “I can’t do it.”

It was dizzying, a blur of sergeants barking orders and pushups and burpies. Beakley was drenched in sweat. He threw up his sausage McMuffin breakfast in a trash can.

As some candidates were sent home, he felt conflicted. He told himself: “This sucks. I need to get in.”

His strategy was to be a private beneath the radar, “to keep the lowest rank and just get it over with.”

He failed miserably at mediocrity.

He began to care.

Darrell Stoops, a 1st lieutenant at the academy, is what’s known as cadre supervisor for the 1st Platoon Wolfpack. Before joining the academy in 2009, he served in the Air Force for 20 years. He has seen hundreds of teens come and go. In Beakley, he witnessed a transformation.

“There are a lot of ways he showed positive growth but one of the most significant ways was he went from being someone more worried about himself to becoming a servant leader,” Stoops said.

Beakley rose to Cadet 1st Sergeant, the second highest rank in the academy.

“It was largely because he wanted to take care of the entire company,” Stoops said. “He genuinely cared about the welfare of his fellow cadets and did his best to make decisions that had the best outcome for all involved… He gained the confidence to make decisions without having to get validation from others and resilience to handle stressful situations without losing his composure.”

In a blue gown, Beakley — who at the academy went by Bullock, the last name he was born with — gave a four-minute speech with 140 other cadet graduates seated behind him. He talked about Gia and grief, venturing down life’s dark paths and the fact that he had not just hurt himself, he had hurt his family.

The reason he’d come to the academy had become secondary to the experience.

“Credits are just the cherry on top of the sundae,” he said.

Race to the end

Beakley returned to Arlington High School. Basketball season had started. He wasn’t on the team.

He transferred to Weston High School in February. He figured he could take some online classes and work full time in construction.

It was a classic miscalculation of ambition and reality.

In April, Weston teacher Kailyn Otto told Beakley he wouldn’t be graduating because he was too far behind.

He quit his job and enrolled in both traditional and online classes, nine in all, including three history courses.

“He basically wanted to prove me wrong,” Otto said. “I was happy about that.”

Beakley decided he would show up and do his work, but there would be no time for making friends and being social.

Once again, his game plan failed.

“He was the light of this school,” Otto said. “He’s that kind of kid. He can get along with everyone.”

The unlikely graduate was chosen to give a commencement speech. His words touched students, staff and families.

“I think everyone had tears in their eyes,” Otto said.

For now, Beakley is washing dishes at a Denny’s. He’s eager to report to U.S. Navy boot camp in August.

Eric Stevick: 425-339-3446; stevick@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Feds drop charges against man accused of mailing explosives

Thanh Cong Phan, of Everett, was deemed mentally incompetent. One package was tracked to Mill Creek.

Everett to consider allowing three more pot shops in city

After months of economic, planning and public safety review, the city council could vote next month.

Dr. Spitters: We’re still in the middle of the pandemic

COVID metrics continue a positive trend, but masks and social distancing are here to stay, officials say.

Everett man accused of shining laster at state patrol plane

He reportedly ran away and hid in some bushes. The plane crew tracked him down.

No more youth jail, group demands at small rally in Everett

The Snohomish County Equity Alliance wants youth treated differently in the criminal justice system.

President Donald Trump nominates Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court

Trump taps ‘eminently qualified’ Barrett for Supreme Court

‘Residency makes you a doctor:’ New WSU program coming to Prov

WSU’s medical college is starting an Everett-based internal medicine residency. New docs will come here.

Sandra Ruffner and her hiking partner got caught in the Downey Creek wildfire while on a 30-mile backpacking trip in the Glacier Peak Wilderness. (Sandra Ruffner)
Trapped by 2,600-acre fire, hikers ran past flames to safety

The Downey Creek Fire east of Darrington tripled in size in September, leaving rangers scrambling to rescue hikers.

Monroe school official apologizes for ‘day drinkers’ comment

Jim Langston made the comment in reference to some parents, while frustrated about remote learning.

Most Read