At Buck’s American Cafe in Everett, manager Jasper Mosbacher prepares a cocktail in a glass jar. Bars are now able to serve cocktails for takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

At Buck’s American Cafe in Everett, manager Jasper Mosbacher prepares a cocktail in a glass jar. Bars are now able to serve cocktails for takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Purchase Photo

Quarantini time! New state rule allows cocktails to-go

Enjoy a margarita or a Manhattan with lunch or dinner to go. At Buck’s in Everett, you keep the mason jar.

EVERETT — Cocktails are back on the menu.

Bars were banned from serving mixed drinks with the March stay-home order that allowed only sealed, bottled beverages and growlers to be sold with food.

No martini during quarantini.

That changed last week when the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board apparently decided we’d been through enough and needed something more to survive the rest of the pandemic.

New rules adopted last week allow bars and restaurants to offer cocktails with any to-go or delivery of a “bona fide complete meal,” which can be an entree.

Other states were already doing it. Washington came late to the party, but it’s reason to celebrate.

“We were floored and excited,” said Thomas Self, co-owner and operator of Hollywood Tavern in Woodinville. “We were ready to launch.”

Customers were ready, as well. The first order last Friday included a cocktail, Self said, as have others since.

At Buck’s American Cafe in Everett, owner James Abbott is mixing it up with drinks that travel well and go with popular menu items.

“It’s more of a one-stop shopping,” Abbott said. “It’s a definite convenience. If people are on the fence about what they’re doing for the night, they know they can get their drinks, appetizer and dinner all at one spot.”

For bars, “it helps keep places viable,” Abbott said. “Everybody was stuck with their full stock of booze and wine and beer.”

The pandemic was a jolt for the Hollywood Tavern, a mainstay in the area. The roadhouse opened in 1947 in a 1922 service station as a popular watering hole for farmers, loggers and mill workers.

People get cocktails who otherwise might not purchase a drink, Self said.

After all, it’s easy enough to open a bottle of wine or beer at home to go with tavern fare, which includes burgers, ribs, Cajun tater tots, fried chicken and fried pickles.

Cocktails are easy, too.

“They are 100% ready for consumption,” Self said. “Add ice and enjoy.”

The three pre-mixed cocktail choices, $9.99 each, are offered curbside only.

So far, the favorite is Wine Country Lemonade, which has vodka, Aperol (an Italian bitter), strawberry, basil, lemonade and brut. Black Barrel Daiquiri has Mount Gay rum, Averna Amaro (an Italian liqueur), lime juice and orange bitters. The Hollywood Paper Plane has bourbon, Averna Amero, Aperol, lime juice and a splash of soda water.

“A lot of these cocktails have four-five-six ingredients,” Self said. “A lot of people don’t have all those ingredients at their home.”

After all, who has a splash of soda water on hand?

Buck’s American Cafe sells pre-mixed cocktails in glass mason jars. New state rules adopted last week allow bars and restaurants to offer cocktails with any to-go or delivery of a “bona fide complete meal.” (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Buck’s American Cafe sells pre-mixed cocktails in glass mason jars. New state rules adopted last week allow bars and restaurants to offer cocktails with any to-go or delivery of a “bona fide complete meal.” (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

At Buck’s, pre-mixed cocktails are sealed in glass mason jars, with curbside and delivery options.

“We stuck with our winners,” Abbott said.

Choices are a Raspberry Lemon Drop for $8, a Cadillac Margarita for $10, or a Bartenders Manhattan, $13. Jar included.

The cafe at 2901 Hewitt Ave. has been operating since 1986. It’s inside the historic Swalwell building that originally housed one of the city’s first banks and later a haberdashery, speakeasy and Pines Tavern. Abbott was hired as a chef in 1997 and took over ownership in 2014. He opened a fine dining restaurant, Abbott’s, in 2017.

Due to the pandemic restrictions, his eateries have gone from a total of about 30 employees to four — a manager and Abbott, his wife and their 15-year-old daughter.

The to-go menu includes steaks, fish tacos, salmon, sweet potato fries and, of course, Buck’s signature peanut-butter pie.

“We’ve been selling a good amount of peanut-butter pie,” Abbott said. “A lot of people buy the whole pie.”

Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield contributed to this story.

Andrea Brown: abrown@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3443. Twitter @reporterbrown.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Vehicles start to back ups at I-5's exit 192 as rush hour begins. (Lizz Giordano / The Herald)
Survey: Snohomish is state’s sixth-healthiest county

While the county has low birth rates among teens, drivers here have some of the longest commute times.

Everett's Christopher Sembroski during centrifuge training at the NASTAR Center in Pennsylvania. (John Kraus/Inspiration4 photo)
Everett’s own spaceman thrilled to join all-civilian mission

Christopher Sembroski is in training to be part of a three-day SpaceX Dragon flight funded by a billionaire.

Police seek suspect in Mountlake Terrace shooting

Two men who were shot were in critical condition and transported to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Snohomish County kicks off new rental assistance program

It starts with nearly $25 million from the U.S. Treasury Department. More funding is expected soon.

A dog died and several people were displaced in a fire at an apartment complex in Mukilteo on Monday. (Mukilteo Fire Department)
Dog dies in Mukilteo apartment fire early Monday

Several people were displaced, and the damage was estimated at $850,000.

Firefighters kept a wildfire in the Grandview area northeast of Arlington from growing beyond the 1.5 acres it torched Sunday afternoon. (North County Fire/EMS)
Brush fire near Arlington scorches grass and shrubs

The fire reached about 1.5 acres Sunday afternoon.

Kelsey Dunlap and Brian Matson. (Contributed photos)
2 Edmonds College students make state all-academic team

Edmonds College students make state all-academic team Edmonds College students Kelsey Dunlap… Continue reading

Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Club president Zachary Nelson explains to a pair of students how the currency works while handing out free cryptocurrency at the University of Washington Bothell on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Crypto’s wild ride: It’s winning fans from here to Wall Street

Digital currency is worth trillions to traders betting on Dogecoin, Bitcoin and other blockchains.

With desks stacked away to provide social distance spacing, tenth grader Zendon Bugge attends a World History class during the first day of school for Everett High students on Monday, April 19, 2021 in Everett, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Students statewide returned to school buildings on Monday

Districts are now required to provide in-person class two days a week for kids through grade 12.

Most Read