Construction of mixed-use buildings at the Riverfront redevelopment, seen here Jan. 15, 2019, could begin this summer. But a central movie theater on the 70-acre parcel won’t be part of it any time soon. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Construction of mixed-use buildings at the Riverfront redevelopment, seen here Jan. 15, 2019, could begin this summer. But a central movie theater on the 70-acre parcel won’t be part of it any time soon. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Riverfront construction could start soon — without a cinema

The pandemic’s effects on movie theaters have delayed some work at the 70-acre Everett development.

EVERETT — Riverfront residents will have to wait a bit longer for their movie theater.

Construction of the cinema is being delayed at least two years after the Everett City Council last month approved amending a development agreement with the company erecting several new mixed-use buildings.

The pandemic is to blame, said a spokesperson for Shelter Holdings, the company developing the 70-acre commercial and mixed-use site between I-5 and the Snohomish River.

“Obviously, COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the local economy,” said Shelter Holdings director of development Eric Evans in an email. “Retail, and specifically cinemas, have been severely impacted by the pandemic. In light of these impacts, the cinema element has been shifted to later phases in the development to allow for more time for this industry to recover.”

The Riverfront development’s proposed movie theater, depicted here in an artist’s rendering, was moved from the first phase, which could begin construction this summer, to a third phase. (Shelter Holdings)

The Riverfront development’s proposed movie theater, depicted here in an artist’s rendering, was moved from the first phase, which could begin construction this summer, to a third phase. (Shelter Holdings)

Shelter Holdings is adding to an area which is already built out with 190 townhouses and 235 single-family homes north and south of the property, redeveloping the former landfill site in six phases. The movie theater was one element of the first phase, which includes a grocery store, over 300 apartments and studios, and 835 parking stalls.

Work on buildings with 31,290 square feet of space — for commercial and retail, as well as a grocery store — could begin as early as this month, pending a pre-construction meeting with the city and approval to proceed, Evans said. Construction of the mixed-use buildings is expected to take about two years.

“COVID-19 has and continues to have a number of impacts on supplies and timelines for construction,” Evans said.

The 70-acre former landfill site being redeveloped for commercial and residential use could see construction begin soon. (Shelter Holdings)

The 70-acre former landfill site being redeveloped for commercial and residential use could see construction begin soon. (Shelter Holdings)

Once finished, the development will connect the single-family homes and the townhouses via the recently constructed Riverfront Boulevard and 41st Street.

In April, the Everett City Council approved amending the development agreement with Shelter Holdings to push the cinema’s construction to the third phase. The council also agreed to extend deadlines in the agreement by about a year.

“This has been a great relationship with Shelter Holdings,” Councilman Jeff Moore said. “… Certainly we cannot argue that COVID-19 has not had an effect on our economy.”

When all six phases are finished, the Riverfront development is projected to have about 1,250 housing units and 2,700 parking spaces, as well as a three-acre park tentatively named Eclipse Mill Park, a 250-room hotel and 123,000 square feet of office space.

In May 2019, the Everett City Council voted to offer Shelter Holdings a property tax break for 12 years if 10% of the units were affordable to households that earn 80% or less than the area median income. Under the terms, housing costs can’t exceed 30% of monthly income to be considered affordable.

Another 10% of the units were reserved for households that make between 80% to 115% of the area median household income, which was $86,691 just a couple of years ago in Snohomish County, according to the U.S. Census.

The land and non-residential spaces will be assessed for property taxes.

Ben Watanabe: bwatanabe@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3037; Twitter @benwatanabe.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Cars drive through the intersection of Highway 9 and South Lake Stevens Road on Thursday, Feb. 17, 2022 in Lake Stevens, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Highway 9 to close this weekend in south Lake Stevens

Detours take drivers around the closure between 20th Street SE and 32nd Street SE from Friday night to Monday morning.

Empty shelves in the baby formula section at a grocery store in Lynnwood, Washington. (Jacqueline Allison / The Herald)
Amid baby formula shortage, local moms scrambling to feed babies

Shelves are bare and prices are up. But there are resources for Snohomish County mothers in need.

Everett
$1 million bail for Everett ampm shooting suspect

The suspect, 36, is accused of shooting an acquaintance Monday, dumping the gun in a dumpster and fleeing from police.

Logo for news use featuring Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Snohomish County seeks input on spending American Rescue Plan dollars

In-person events across the county will help guide more than $80 million in federal recovery money.

Mandy Jeffcott and Aaron King explore the area beneath a highway underpass while conducting a PIT count Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Snohomish County homelessness rose to 10-year high, count shows

Data released Monday confirmed what advocates suspected: The local homeless population grew amid the pandemic.

Sam Bowles records the run off the water from a chalk drawing with friend and co-artist, Rhyanna Mercer, Tuesday afternoon in Everett, Washington on May 10, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Jackson High’s global TikTok star is chalk full of ideas

Sam Bowles, 18, uses vibrant videos and social media fame to raise awareness of autism.

Dan Bates / The Herald
When Seattle Genetics founder, Clay Siegall lost his father while in college, he switched from studying for an MD to studying for a PhD., and a goal to treat cancer patients.  His efforts are paying off in lives.
Bothell biotech CEO resigns after domestic-violence allegation

Clay Siegall co-founded Seagen, which develops therapies for cancer patients. He’s accused of attacking his wife.

Everett
Nonprofit offers free mental wellness event for local teens

The Saturday gathering at EvCC, sponsored by Leadership Launch, is for teens in eighth grade through college.

Logo for news use featuring Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
3.6-magnitude earthquake jars awake Darrington residents

The quake and aftershocks did not cause any serious damage. They’re reminders of dozens of faults that lie below.

Most Read