The 100,000-square-foot Amazon fulfillment/delivery center at the Port of Everett’s Riverside Business Park is expected to hire hundreds of workers. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

The 100,000-square-foot Amazon fulfillment/delivery center at the Port of Everett’s Riverside Business Park is expected to hire hundreds of workers. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)

An Everett business park is getting a big new tenant: Amazon

The company will open a new distribution center at the Port of Everett’s Riverside Business Park.

EVERETT — Amazon, the Seattle-based online retail giant, is expected to open a new distribution center at the Riverside Business Park in northeast Everett.

The facility is located in the 600 block of Riverside Road, near BNSF Railway Co.’s Delta Yard, and just west of the FedEx Freight distribution center at the Port of Everett’s 86-acre industrial waterfront business park along the Snohomish River.

Amazon reportedly leased the lion’s share of a 204,498 square-foot building developed by Panattoni Development a Newport, California-based global real estate company.

That would still make it smaller than Amazon’s typical fulfillment centers, which are usually a half-million square feet or more in size.

Amazon declined to comment.

However, temporary signs that said “Welcome Amazonians” and “Amazonians Start Here,” have been placed outside the building, and port officials confirmed Amazon’s occupancy.

It’s not clear when the center will open or how many people it would employ.

Lisa Lefeber, the port’s deputy executive director and future CEO, said Panattoni developed the property, called Glacier Peak, without the commitment of a client or tenant.

“That doesn’t typically happen,” said Lefeber, who replaces current port CEO Les Reardanz on Oct. 16.

Panattoni, a Newport, California-based global real estate development firm purchased 10 acres of the business park from the port for $3.7 million in 2017.

Donnie Belk, development manager at Panattoni Development’s Tacoma office, said the company does not discuss the names of its tenants without their permission.

“However, we are very pleased with the two tenants we have signed leases with this year,” Belk wrote in an email. “Glacier Peak at Riverside Business Park has been a great success thus far and we are 75% full with approximately 52,000 square feet remaining on the south end of the building. I would like to publicly thank the Port of Everett who developed the business park’s roads, bridge and utility extensions. Their vision was spot on and we are very happy to be a part of it,” Belk concluded.

Based on the center’s estimated size, Dan Eernissee, Everett’s economic development director, said he expects it would employ at least 100.

“Knowing Amazon, they probably want to get things up and running by the holidays,” he said.

Amazon will join Motor Trucks International, aerospace firm Safranand other companies at Riverside Business Park.

This isn’t Amazon’s first foray into Snohomish County.

In 2017, the company leased a 92,000-square-foot warehouse in south Everett for its “last-mile efforts,” part of its drive to deliver packages to customers.

In January, Amazon chose the county’s sidewalks for a field test of its mini-fridge sized, autonomous delivery robots.

“We are excited that Amazon is expanding their footprint in Snohomish County and look forward to supporting their continued success here. This is another demonstration of the strength of the industrial market in Snohomish County and that reinforces the importance of industrial lands and facilities in attracting jobs and investment to our community,” said Patrick Pierce, president and CEO of Economic Alliance Snohomish County.

The port purchased what would become the Riverside Business Park — the site of a former Weyerhaeuser mill that operated from 1915 into the 1980s — in 1998.

The site has undergone extensive environmental cleanup, and the port spent most of 2012 bringing in soil to raise the land above the 100-year flood plain.

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

FILE - In this Tuesday, June 20, 2017 file photo a Boing 737 MAX 9 airplane performs a demonstration flight at the Paris Air Show, in Le Bourget, east of Paris, France. Europe’s aviation regulator has taken a step closer to letting the Boeing 737 Max fly again. It published a proposed airworthiness directive on Tuesday that could see it clear the aircraft within weeks to resume flying after nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, file)
European regulator moves to clear Boeing 737 for flight

The move comes after the FAA already cleared the Boeing 737 Max earlier this month.

Diners Bonnie Breitman, left, and Casey McGan huddle near an outdoor gas fire as they eat lunch outside in a blustery wind Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Bellingham, Wash. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Sunday announced tighter restrictions in the state in response to a flood of new cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Restaurants and bars will again be limited to outdoor dining and to-go service, gyms, and some entertainment centers will be required to close indoor services. Retail stores, including grocery stores, will be ordered to limit indoor capacity and indoor social gatherings will be prohibited unless attendees have quarantined for 14 days or tested negative for COVID-19 and quarantined for a week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
New shutdown expected to cost Washington restaurants $800M

The Washington Hospitality Association urged lawmakers to figure out ways to support hospitality businesses.

Burton Clemans, an employee at Sisters for 8 years, packages up a Sisters cookie on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Sisters closes, for now, as eateries enter another lockdown

The four-week ban on indoor dining has local restaurants pondering whether to shut their doors for good.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks during a news conference, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Inslee announced new restrictions on businesses and social gatherings for the next four weeks as the state continues to combat a rising number of coronavirus cases. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Inslee announces $135 million pandemic relief plan

The state will use CARES Act dollars to help businesses and people impacted by latest restrictions.

The AFK Tavern is closing up shop on Nov. 28 after 10 years due to their lease being up and the impact of COVID on November 15, 2020.  (Kevin ClAFK / The Herald)
Game over: After 10 years, last call at Everett’s AFK Tavern

The closing is due to COVID and the end of a lease. The owner hopes to reopen elsewhere in 2022.

Steve Dickson, administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Aviation Summit in Washington, D.C., on March 5, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by Zach Gibson.
FAA faces its own reckoning as it gives Boeing path to fly jet

The agency is devoting more time and resources to assess how pilots react to emergencies.

Middle-school counselor Shanon Baker poses for a photo in the school's library Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in Sammamish, Wash. A master's degree and a full-time job weren't enough to help Baker land an apartment she could afford in Seattle's east-side suburbs. But a $750 million commitment by a partnership backed in part by Microsoft's affordable housing initiative helped do the trick. Urban Housing Ventures is cutting rents at 40% of the units in three buildings as part of an effort to make sure teachers, nurses and other middle-income professionals can live in the communities where they work. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Microsoft-led housing effort cuts rents in Seattle suburbs

The plan is to help middle-income professionals live in the communities where they work.

The father of Bhavye Suneja, one of the pilots of a Lion Air plane that crashed in Indonesia, reacts as he leaves for the airport in New Delhi, India, on Oct.29, 2018. The pilot's mother, Sangeeta Suneja, says the FAA and Boeing are bringing the 737 Max back to service prematurely. (AP Photo, file)
Pilot’s mother criticizes FAA, Boeing for rushing Max’s comeback

Her son lost control of a Lion Air plane after an automated system repeatedly pushed its nose down.

Steve Hobbs
Democratic lawmakers ask Inslee to lift ban on indoor dining

They want to try to scaling back on occupancy before forcing an end to inside service.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, file photo, a Boeing 737 Max jet, piloted by Federal Aviation Administration Chief Steve Dickson, prepares to land at Boeing Field following a test flight in Seattle. The FAA is poised to clear the Boeing 737 Max to fly again after grounding the jets for nearly two years due to a pair of disastrous crashes that killed 346 people. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
After 20-month grounding, FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly

U.S. airlines will be able to fly the plane after software is updated and pilots receive training.

Alicia Crank, chair of the Snohomish County Airport Commission, at Paine Field on Monday, Nov. 16, 2020 in Everett, Washington. The Snohomish County-owned airfield is due to update the Airport Master Plan, considered a blue-print for long term development, anticipated land use and a requirement of the Federal Aviation Administration. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Time to update the airport’s master plan, and you can help

The new chair of the Snohomish County Airport Commission wants everyone to get acquainted with Paine Field.

Boeing 737 Max airplanes are parked at Boeing Field in Seattle on July 27, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by David Ryder
Once beloved Boeing is among titans headed for zombie status

Policymakers may inadvertently be directing the flow of capital to unproductive firms.