Mother-daughter duo Judi and Emma Kate Ramsey join together to run Artisans PNW on Hewitt Avenue on Nov. 26, in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Mother-daughter duo Judi and Emma Kate Ramsey join together to run Artisans PNW on Hewitt Avenue on Nov. 26, in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Artisans PNW in Everett offers local gifts, books and art

The Everett store that opened in May can trace its roots to an enterprising Girl Scout troop in Snohomish.

EVERETT — Artisans PNW, an Everett bookstore and gift shop, can trace its roots to a local Girl Scout troop that wanted to make the world a better place.

The enterprising troop fashioned jewelry from old silverware, repurposed second-hand sweaters and mixed up environmentally friendly cleaning products.

It then offered the items for sale at local consignment shops, said Emma Kate Ramsey, who runs Artisans PNW with her mother, Judi Ramsey.

Emma Kate Ramsey was one of those Girl Scouts. Her mother Judi was a troop leader.

That spirit of handcrafted, locally made items and books flourishes at Artisans PNW at 1800 Hewitt Ave., as well as Artisans Books and Coffee at 1802 Hewitt Ave. in Everett.

The store offers jewelry, candles, soap, ornaments, cards and carved wooden objects from over 100 Pacific Northwest artisans, artists and small-batch manufacturers.

Ask to see the Kraken teapot created by Rachel Recker owner of Salish Sea Ceramic Studio, at 1111 Hewitt Ave., the works of Ruth Blair, a Marysville wood-burning artist, or the bracelets and jewelry of Christina Jordan, a local chain mail artist.

For a quick fix, try the Art-o-mat, a repurposed cigarette vending machine that dispenses Marlboro-size packs of art cards for $5.

Books line the shelves at Artisans PNW on Hewitt Avenue on Nov. 26, in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Books line the shelves at Artisans PNW on Hewitt Avenue on Nov. 26, in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Searching for a page-turner?

Here you’ll also find nonfiction, fiction and children’s books written by local authors, such as Mary E. Trimble, of Camano Island, or Toni Kief, a Marysville writer who pens “Boomer fiction.”

Each month, Artisan features the work of a local artist.

“We want to promote the local economy and promote local artists,” Emma Kate Ramsey said.

You’ll find bags, T-shirts and other apparel by Retrøvisiøn, local high school graduates who’ve started their own clothing brand.

“One of them is a regular in our coffee shop and comes in and works on the designs,” Emma Kate Ramsey said.

There’s always something you’ll overlook the first time through, so give yourself an hour or so to peruse the shelves or make a second date.

“There’s so much going on,” she added.

To visit the cafe where you can grab lunch or a latte, walk through the back of the store.

Artisans was previously located in Snohomish.

“After surviving the pandemic as a small business, our landlord decided not to renew our lease,” Emma Kate Ramsey said.

Light shines through the window on some of the local-made merchandise on sale at Artisans PNW on Nov. 16, in downtown Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Light shines through the window on some of the local-made merchandise on sale at Artisans PNW on Nov. 16, in downtown Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

For years, mother and daughter had talked about moving to Everett.

Eventually they found a storefront in the Hodge’s Building on Hewitt that had been empty for years after fire swept through the five-story building in 2013.

“We took a tour through the landlord’s available buildings and this was the one that spoke to us,” Emma Kate Ramsey said.

When the Ramseys began their renovations, they encountered water damaged walls and floors.

“It took 10 months to finish because there were a lot of surprises,” Emma Kate Ramsey said.

Despite challenges, they’ve managed to create an eye-catching store and displays, brilliantly illuminated by floor-to-ceiling windows.

For those who want to try their hand at making art, Artisan’s offers art and painting classes.

Janice Podsada: 425-339-3097; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @JanicePods.

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Business

Lynnwood
New Jersey company acquires Lynnwood Land Rover dealership

Land Rover Seattle, now Land Rover Lynnwood, has been purchased by Holman, a 100-year-old company.

Szabella Psaztor is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Szabella Pasztor: Change begins at a grassroots level

As development director at Farmer Frog, Pasztor supports social justice, equity and community empowerment.

Owner and founder of Moe's Coffee in Arlington Kaitlyn Davis poses for a photo at the Everett Herald on March 22, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)
Kaitlyn Davis: Bringing economic vitality to Arlington

More than just coffee, Davis has created community gathering spaces where all can feel welcome.

Simreet Dhaliwal is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Simreet Dhaliwal: A deep-seated commitment to justice

The Snohomish County tourism and economic specialist is determined to steer change and make a meaningful impact.

Emerging Leader John Michael Graves. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
John Michael Graves: Champion for diversity and inclusion

Graves leads training sessions on Israel, Jewish history and the Holocaust and identifying antisemitic hate crimes.

Gracelynn Shibayama, the events coordinator at the Edmonds Center for the Arts, is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Gracelynn Shibayama: Connecting people through the arts and culture

The Edmonds Center for the Arts coordinator strives to create a more connected and empathetic community.

Eric Jimenez, a supervisor at Cocoon House, is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Eric Jimenez: Team player and advocate for youth

As an advocate for the Latino community, sharing and preserving its traditions is central to Jimenez’ identity.

Nathanael Engen, founder of Black Forest Mushrooms, an Everett gourmet mushroom growing operation is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Nathanael Engen: Growing and sharing gourmet mushrooms

More than just providing nutritious food, the owner of Black Forest Mushrooms aims to uplift and educate the community.

Molbak's Garden + Home in Woodinville, Washington closed on Jan. 28 2024. (Photo courtesy of Molbak's)
Molbak’s, former Woodinville garden store, hopes for a comeback

Molbak’s wants to create a “hub” for retailers and community groups at its former Woodinville store. But first it must raise $2.5 million.

DJ Lockwood, a Unit Director at the Arlington Boys & Girls Club, is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
DJ Lockwood: Helping the community care for its kids

As director of the Arlington Boys & Girls Club, Lockwood has extended the club’s programs to more locations and more kids.

Alex Tadio, the admissions director at WSU Everett, is an Emerging Leader. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Alex Tadio: A passion for education and equality

As admissions director at WSU Everett, he hopes to give more local students the chance to attend college.

Dr. Baljinder Gill and Lavleen Samra-Gill are the recipients of a new Emerging Business award. Together they run Symmetria Integrative Medical. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Emerging Business: The new category honors Symmetria Integrative Medical

Run by a husband and wife team, the chiropractic and rehabilitation clinic has locations in Arlington, Marysville and Lake Stevens.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.