Chloe Charles (center) jumps into the middle of a picture being taken by Jada Summers of the girls’ respective mothers, Renee Charles (left) and Debbie Summers, outside a Chick-Fil-A in Lynnwood in May 2015. (Mark Mulligan / Herald File)

Chloe Charles (center) jumps into the middle of a picture being taken by Jada Summers of the girls’ respective mothers, Renee Charles (left) and Debbie Summers, outside a Chick-Fil-A in Lynnwood in May 2015. (Mark Mulligan / Herald File)

Two more Chick-Fil-A restaurants coming to Snohomish County

Chains of the popular chicken franchise are set to open in Marysville and Lynnwood.

LYNNWOOD — More chicken is on the way to Snohomish County.

Chick-Fil-A restaurants are coming to Marysville and Lynnwood, bringing the county total to four. Nationally, the chicken franchise is known as one of the most difficult restaurants to open. The company’s chain application acceptance rate is less than 1%, according to multiple reports.

The Marysville location, just off the 88th Street exit of I-5, is under construction. The frame of the building is complete but no opening date has been set, city spokeswoman Connie Mennie said.

“For like six months, it’s been ‘When is Chick-Fil-A going to open?’” she said.

The company’s website lists the Marysville location as “coming soon.”

When the day comes, the city’s police and public works departments are preparing to mitigate expected traffic overloads surrounding the restaurant.

“We experienced that when the Sonic Drive-In opened here also,” Mennie said.

When Lynnwood got its first Chick-Fil-A, on 196th Street, in 2015, more than 100 people camped outside the restaurant waiting for the doors to open.

The scene was the same in Bothell in 2017, when the county’s second chain opened.

That’s because the company treats each branch’s first 100 customers with a free meal each week for a year.

Lynnwood’s second location is in early permitting and review stages with no timeline for when it may open, city spokeswoman Julie Moore said.

The chicken restaurant will take the place of a 76 gas station on Highway 99, 2½ miles away from the city’s first Chick-Fil-A.

The convenience store will close June 23 and be torn down during construction.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

‘Voice of Everett’ receives Herald’s top Emerging Leader award

Julio Cortes, 34, brings ‘passion and fearlessness to uplift our community.’

FAA probing Boeing’s alleged pressure on designated inspectors

A federal criminal probe has also been opened against the company in the wake of 2 fatal crashes.

She teaches the traditional language of Coast Salish tribes

Natosha Gobin is spreading her passion for Lushootseed to tribal and non-tribal students.

‘I want to live and raise a family where everyone has a home’

Alexander Lark once built nest boxes for ducks. Now he raises money for Housing Hope and its families.

She knows the transformative power of education

Ambar Martinez also knows first hand the challenge of acclimation for people of diverse backgrounds.

He helps veterans achieve their educational and career goals

Chester Curtis helped raise money to open a center that serves veterans and their families.

He wants to ‘leave my community better than I found it’

WSU Everett spokesman Randy Bolerjack has a message for all students: Help your community thrive.

She’s making sure young people don’t feel lost or left out

Through her tireless efforts, Nicole Amor connects people with needed programs and services.

A ‘mother interested in helping kids’ hopes to end stereotypes

Edmonds activist and consultant Courtney Wooten advocates for children throughout Snohomish County.

Most Read