Gabe Fitzpatrick, 11, serves ice cream out of his parents’ Yay Big Yay High Yay Ice Cream Truck on Saturday, outside Eisenhower Middle School in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Gabe Fitzpatrick, 11, serves ice cream out of his parents’ Yay Big Yay High Yay Ice Cream Truck on Saturday, outside Eisenhower Middle School in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Your guide to Everett’s food truck bonanza at Fisherman’s Village

Thirteen food trucks are there to feed you at the musical festival this week in downtown Everett. Here’s a rundown.

EVERETT — If you ever wanted Indian street food, birria tacos, currywurst, bubble tea, grilled cheese and Texas-style barbecue all within walking distance, then Night Market at Fisherman’s Village is your dreamland come true.

The market at 2930 Wetmore Ave. is free to enter and will feature more than 40 artisan vendors at the Everett Makers Market, as well as live music by local and regional artists, a beer garden and, of course, food. You’ll have a choice of 13 food vendors, so pace yourself.

The Fisherman’s Village’s block party is open to all ages, but you must be 21 or over to enter the beer garden.

Hours for the Night Market are 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. May 20 and noon to 10 p.m. May 21.

A full list of Night Market musicians, curated vendors and food vendors can be found at thefishermansvillage.com/night-market.

Because the festival has such an impressive number of food vendors this year, we provided a guide for those who are interested in (or overwhelmed by) all the options. Note: Pricing and menu options may differ at some trucks, as we were not able to contact all vendors and instead relied on online menus for some.

Remember that most of these food vendors are seasonal and year-round businesses, so follow them on social media to stay updated on their whereabouts. You can also find many of them on streetfoodfinder.com.

C. Davis Texas BBQ

The gist: Keeping it short and savory at Night Market, C. Davis Texas BBQ is serving up their two bestsellers: A choice of smoked brisket or pulled pork over waffle fries. Catch them at Night Market on Friday.

What sticks out: The pulled pork and brisket are each smoked for 12 hours, with wood and rubs shipped all the way from Texas. If that wasn’t impressive enough, C. Davis has catered for the Seattle Seahawks.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: No vegetarian options this time around. We recommend confirming with the vendor that their dishes are gluten-free.

Pricing: $16.50 for either the smoked brisket or pulled pork, both served with waffle fries.

Das Bratmobile serves up German classics like currywurst, schnitzel, potato salad, frikadellen (seasoned pork-and-beef hamburgers) and more. (Photo courtesy of Ferdi Edrich)

Das Bratmobile serves up German classics like currywurst, schnitzel, potato salad, frikadellen (seasoned pork-and-beef hamburgers) and more. (Photo courtesy of Ferdi Edrich)

Das Bratmobile

The gist: Iconic German street food like currywurst (sausage with a spiced tomato/ketchup sauce), using brats from Seattle-based Uli’s Famous Sausage, as well as schnitzel, potato salad, hamburgers and more. Catch them at Night Market on Friday and Saturday.

What sticks out: Their German hamburger (“frikadelle”) is handmade with a mixture of pork and beef and seasonings (by the way, co-owner Ferdi Edrich goes by Burgalicious). Try their homemade patties in the Pastrami Mommy, dressed with pastrami, cheddar and onion rings. Co-owner (and Edrich’s sister) Uschi Leach said they invented the Pastrami Mommy because, “We needed a burger that Guy Fieri would be into.” Get a side of potato salad, too: Das Bratmobile puts bacon and German pickles in theirs. They also import their sauerkraut from Germany.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: The chipotle black bean burger is vegetarian and can include the toppings of your choice.

Pricing: $5 to $15, per their website

Dreamy Drinks serves up unicorn-worthy beverages, like strawberry matcha lattes, classic milk tea with boba and a caffeine-free brown sugar boba latte. (Photo courtesy of Kaye Fan)

Dreamy Drinks serves up unicorn-worthy beverages, like strawberry matcha lattes, classic milk tea with boba and a caffeine-free brown sugar boba latte. (Photo courtesy of Kaye Fan)

Dreamy Drinks

The gist: Unicorn-worthy refreshments like classic milk tea with boba, matcha lattes and strawberry smoothies. Catch Dreamy Drinks at Night Market on Friday.

What sticks out: The strawberry matcha latte is a colorful, delicious mood-lifter. Go for the brown sugar boba latte for an equally delicious option that’s also caffeine-free.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: All Dreamy Drinks have dairy-free substitutions available.

Pricing: $5 to $6

El Mariachi birria y tacos

The gist: Serving up birria tacos, tortas, quesadillas, burritos and more, El Mariachi brings classic street food to Night Market on Friday and Saturday.

What sticks out: A match made in heaven, El Mariachi’s birria ramen combines the earthy, smoky and spicy flavors of birria with the brothy, bone-warming, noodle-y goodness of ramen.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: You can substitute soyrizo and vegan cheese in their quesadillas, tacos, burritos and tortas. They also serve keto tacos. Be sure to ask about gluten-free options.

Pricing: $3.50 (for a single taco) to $14 (for the birria ramen)

Gourmini’s

The gist: A healthy option for fest goers, Gourmini’s serves up fresh salads, soups and mini paninis/sandwiches with housemade spreads, premium deli meats and vegetables, using locally baked baguettes. Pick two or three, or one big salad for a meal. Catch Gourmini’s at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: Pair the balsamic strawberry salad with the prosciutto sandwich, featuring Gourmini’s basil pesto, fresh mozzarella, roma tomato and organic greens.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Peanut butter and jelly, but make it gourmet with fresh sliced strawberries, Adam’s crunchy peanut butter and Danish Orchards strawberry preserves. Gourmini’s also has a basil-forward caprese sandwich and fresh salads.

Pricing: Pricing was not immediately available at the time of publishing

Little Jamie’s Mini Donuts

The gist: The name says it all. These are the cutest little doughnuts you ever did see, and the perfect festival food. Catch Little Jamie’s at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: You get to enjoy live music and fried-to-order mini doughnuts at the same time.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Check with the vendor to ensure doughnuts are vegetarian.

Pricing: Pricing was not immediately available at the time of publishing.

Poke Me

The gist: “Hawaiian fusion on the go.” Build your own poke bowl with a myriad of toppings and protein options. Catch Poke Me at Night Market on Friday.

What sticks out: The range of protein choices, from classic limu (seaweed) ahi to smoked squid and wasabi ahi. You can also add fruit to your bowl.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Vegan options like tofu and spicy tofu are available, as well as gluten-free choices.

Pricing: $13 to $15 (based on their website)

Vulpine Espresso

The gist: Featuring classics like Americano and cappuccino, as well as seasonally rotated drinks, the “coffee where you are” trailer will be at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: You’ll get a sneak peek at Vulpine’s Espresso’s summer menu (think coconut, raspberry, pineapple and other sunny day flavors).

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Vulpine Espresso has milk substitutions and gluten-free options.

Pricing: Pricing was not immediately available at the time of publishing.

Best of Both Worlds

The gist: A keto-friendly food truck that dishes out low-carb pasta, hamburgers, fried chicken, cake and more. Catch Best of Both Worlds at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: Their chicken parmesan on a stick, meaning you can walk around the festival with a sit-down type of meal. We also spotted a cornmeal waffle corndog on their sample menu.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Most dishes are gluten-free or have a gluten-free option. Some vegan and vegetarian options may also be available.

Pricing:

Pie Bar

The gist: Baking up some of the dreamiest pies in the Greater Seattle Area, Pie Bar will be at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: We don’t have an exact menu, but you can expect fruit (hello Ballard Bumble Berry Crumble), cream (peanut butter! banana cream! cookies and cream!) and possibly savory (we saw cheesy French onion beef on Pie Bar’s website) filled options. So grab a slice, bop around the festival, shut your pie hole and listen to the music.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Their crimini mushroom pot pie and cherry pie are both listed as vegan. Be sure to ask about vegan/vegetarian options.

Pricing: Pie slices on a third-party delivery service cost between $10 and $13.50. Prices at the food truck may differ.

Thai U Up

The gist: Thai favorites you can find at the Night Market on Friday and Saturday, including pad thai, pad see ew (with wide rice noodles), pad prik khing (stir-fried green beans in a shrimp red curry sauce), crispy garlic chicken, panang curry and more. Stay cool and sweet with the Thai iced tea.

What sticks out: The volcano chicken, deep-fried marinated chicken coated in Thai U Up’s house sauce. Wet wipes required, deliciousness guaranteed.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Both their broccoli and veggie delights are solid options, as well as the vegetarian spring rolls. Ask about other vegetarian options and substitutions, as fish sauce and shrimp paste are often used in Thai cooking.

Pricing: $7 to $14 (based on third-party platform prices)

The Cheese Pit

The gist: Your friendly neighborhood grilled cheese food truck is serving up the gooiest glory on sourdough bread made by Seattle-based Macrina Bakery. Catch them at the Night Market on Friday.

What sticks out: The Pepper Bomb, a — you guessed it — spicy grilled cheese with pepper jack cheese, fresh jalapeños and the Cheese Pit’s house sweet & spicy maple-sriracha sauce on fresh-baked sourdough bread. For meat lovers, they serve up smoked ham, bacon and turkey breast grilled cheese.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: The Goodie 2 Shoes “ain’t your mama’s vegan sandwich” and contains “lots of yummy, melty vegan cheese.” Their classic “Old Skool,” “Cheese Luvvas” and “Pepper Bomb” are all vegetarian-friendly. Gluten-free bread is also available at no extra charge.

Pricing: $9 to $14

Juvi Joshi of The Food Atlas shows off samosa chaat, an Indian street flavor bomb. The samosa, a fried veggie-stuffed pastry, is topped with chana masala (a North Indian chickpea dish). The dish is doused with chickpea curry yogurt, tamarind date chutney, mint jalapeño chutney and then showered with puffed rice, chickpea noodles, cilantro and pomegranate. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

Juvi Joshi of The Food Atlas shows off samosa chaat, an Indian street flavor bomb. The samosa, a fried veggie-stuffed pastry, is topped with chana masala (a North Indian chickpea dish). The dish is doused with chickpea curry yogurt, tamarind date chutney, mint jalapeño chutney and then showered with puffed rice, chickpea noodles, cilantro and pomegranate. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

The Food Atlas

The gist: A flavor explosion that hits every taste receptor and food craving, aka Indian street food. The Food Atlas makes “chaat,” a family of savory snacks you can find at stalls and street markets across India and other southeast Asian countries. Co-owner Emilie Davis joked that chaat means “finger-lickin’ good, but that was taken by KFC.” Her husband, co-owner Yuvi Joshi, is from Mumbai and began making chana masala and samosa chaat during the pandemic, as he missed his family (and their home cooking). “I ate it and was like, ‘Oh my god, I’m sorry but we need to sell this,” Davis said. Catch them both Friday and Saturday at the Night Market.

What sticks out: The samosa chaat is their bestseller. Joshi takes a samosa (a fried veggie-stuffed pastry) and smashes it down before topping with chana masala (a spiced North Indian chickpea dish). The dish is then doused with a rainbow of sauces: chickpea curry yogurt, tamarind date chutney and mint jalapeño chutney, then showered with puffed rice, chickpea noodles, cilantro and pomegranate. Wash it all down with their mango lassi.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Most of the options at The Food Atlas are vegetarian, and they also serve gluten-free options like pakora, a spiced and fried veggie fritter.

Pricing: $7 to $15

Theo’s Gyros

The gist: Gyros (obviously) with your choice of falafel, lamb, beef or chicken, and a not-so-typical option of pork belly. Theo’s also serves up Greek-style bowls, salads, marinated chicken thighs (“souvlaki”) and fries. Catch Theo’s on Friday.

What sticks out: The roasted pork belly gyro with all the fixin’s, including Theo’s tzaziki sauce and a Greek-style pico.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Falafel, hummus, fries, baklava, pita. Ask about gluten-free options.

Pricing: $3.50 (for baklava) to $14 (for a Greek bowl)

Yay Big Yay High Yay Ice Cream

The gist: Adorable ice cream treats sold out of an adorable Honda Acty mini truck and micro van. The Fitzpatrick family sells ice cream classics that’ll make you feel like a kid again, running down the street for your favorite Spongebob popsicle (even though the eyes were always wonky, and yes, Yay Big Yay sells these too). Catch them both days at Night Market. Yay Big Yay is a product of Shelina and Skyler Fitzpatrick joking about owning the world’s smallest ice cream truck, and their son Gabe’s love of food trucks. And if you were curious about the name, the Fitzpatrick family explains it here: “How big is that ice cream truck? …Oh it’s about yay big. The owner is only 10?! …Yea, he is only about yay high. You have ice cream? YAY ice cream!”

What sticks out: California natives will be familiar with It’s-It: Circa 1928, the oatmeal cookie ice cream sandwich (vanilla or mint) is dunked in dark chocolate.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: Some popsicles are dairy-free and gluten-free.

Pricing: $2 to $4

Yummy Catch

The gist: The perfect compromise when you’re in the mood for katsu chicken with Japanese curry, but your friend wants southern-style fried fish, and your uncle wants butterfly shrimp, and your significant other is craving orange chicken. Yummy Catch specializes in both southern-style fried seafood as well as Asian cuisine. Yummy Catch will be at Night Market on Saturday.

What sticks out: The tempura rockfish with Japanese curry and rice combines fried fish with the deeply layered, umami flavors of Japanese curry.

Vegan/Vegetarian/Gluten-free options: The spring rolls are vegetarian. Ask about gluten-free options.

Pricing: $5 (for potstickers and spring rolls) to $15 (for three-piece beer-battered cod with fries).

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Food & Drink

Diamond Knot is partnering with APEX Art & Culture Center to mix APEX’s Dogtown Collection artwork with its beer cans. (Photo provided by Diamond Knot Brewing Company)
Diamond Knot Brewing taps Everett’s APEX to add street art to beer cans

The Mukilteo brewery partnered with the art and culture center to slap graffiti-style artwork on its newest beer releases.

Fred’s Rivertown Alehouse owners Mark and Ginger Nuss at the “staff table” inside the alehouse on Tuesday, June 4, 2024 in Snohomish, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
As owner faces health scare, patrons rally around Snohomish bar

Fred’s Rivertown Alehouse owners Mark “Chewey” Nuss and his wife, Ginger, face mounting medical bills and home care costs.

Melinda Grenier serves patrons at her coffee truck called Hay Girl Coffee during the third annual Arlington Pride event in Arlington, Washington on Sunday, June 2, 2024. (Annie Barker / The Herald)
Hidden costs, delays crush hopeful food truck owners in Snohomish County

Melinda Grenier followed her dream to open Hay Girl Coffee. Thousands in fees later, it has cost her more than she bargained for.

This super-fast shrimp scampi makes a tasty, easy summer meal

By Perry Mascitti / Tulalip Resort Casino With “National Shrimp Scampi Day”… Continue reading

Once-hot direct-to-consumer pots and pans are up for grabs on secondhand marketplaces at steep discounts — or ending in the garbage. (Shawn Michael Jones/The New York Times)
Is this the end of Instagram cookware?

Once-hot direct-to-consumer pots and pans are up for grabs on secondhand marketplaces at steep discounts — or ending in the garbage.

Stephen Chavez, owner of Crossed Arrows Brewery, speaks about the future of his brewery. (Photo by Caitlyn Anderson)
Army veteran right at home with Crossed Arrows Brewery on Whidbey Island

At his home-based brewery, Stephen Chavez makes the beer he likes, with flavors like root beer, creamsicle and jalapeño.

A person walks into Paris Baguette next to the Alderwood Mall on Thursday, May 30, 2024 in Lynnwood, Washington. This is the first Paris Baguette location to open in Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Cafe latte and pastries, anyone? Paris Baguette opens in Lynnwood

On a roll: The franchise opened six new U.S. bakery cafes this year, including the first Washington store in Lynnwood.

Eggs at Cackle Hatchery in Lebanon, Mo., Jan. 26, 2023. How long do eggs really last? Believe it or not: It’s longer than you think. (Neeta Satam/The New York Times)
How long do eggs really last?

Believe it or not: It’s longer than you think.

It may be hard to stick to your food budget, but there are many ways to be resourceful with what you have without feeling as though you have your head just above water. (Chris Gash/The New York Times)  — FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH NYT STORY SLUGGED GROCERY SPENDING TIPS BY KRYSTEN CHAMBROT FOR MAY 16, 2024. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. —
9 Tips to Stretch Your Food Budget

These expert hacks can help you lower your grocery bill.

Tony Cladusbid, co-owner of the Beaver Tales Coffee franchise, watches over the canoe racing at the Penn Cove Water Festival on Saturday. (Photo by Sam Fletcher)
More than coffee: Swinomish Native shares family history and wisdom

Tony Cladusbid is the co-owner of Beaver Tales Coffee in Coupeville. He recently changed his name to honor his heritage.

FILE — Newly filled bottles of Sriracha hot sauce at Huy Fong Foods in Irwindale, Calif., on April 28, 2014. Huy Fong, the maker of the most popular variety of Sriracha sauce, told distributors in May 2024 that it would halt production of all its products until at least September, rekindling fears of another prolonged shortage of the beloved condiment. (Emily Berl/The New York Times)
Another Sriracha shortage may be on the horizon. What happened?

Huy Fong Foods, the producer of the most popular variety of Sriracha sauce, has faced several supply glitches over the years.

Pablo Garduno and the team at Barbacoa Judith’s churn out pit-roasted lamb tacos by the dozen at the Hidden Gems Weekend Market on Sunday, April 28, 2024, at Boom City in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Eating our way through Tulalip’s Hidden Gems weekend market

Don’t miss the pupusas, pit-roasted lamb tacos, elotes and even produce for your next meal.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.