Trevor Noah was forced to remain silent during a taping of “The Daily Show” due to a vocal issue. (TNS)

Trevor Noah was forced to remain silent during a taping of “The Daily Show” due to a vocal issue. (TNS)

A vocal problem silences Trevor Noah during ‘Daily Show’

Doctors ordered the host to refrain from speaking, so cast members did the talking for him.

  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018 12:12pm
  • Life

The show must go on.

“Daily Show” host Trevor Noah appeared on his nightly broadcast Tuesday —but stayed silent throughout the episode.

Noah is battling a vocal issue and was instructed by his doctor not to speak in an effort to avoid needing surgery, it was revealed on the show.

Tuesday’s episode began with Noah sitting next to comic Mike Acosta, who addressed the audience on behalf of the host.

“You’ve probably noticed that this is a little different,” Acosta said, speaking as Noah. “Well, what happened was, over the weekend, I lost my voice.”

Acosta read the monologue for Tuesday’s show, while fellow comic Roy Wood Jr. sat down next to Noah for a later segment. Throughout the episode, Noah made hand gestures to go along with whatever his guests were saying.

They did not reveal how long Noah is expected to be on vocal rest, or how the hosting duties will be addressed moving forward.

Noah, who took over the Comedy Central program in 2015, was in Johannesburg, South Africa, over the weekend to host a Global Citizen concert commemorating Nelson Mandela.

The 34-year-old Noah, who was born in Johannesburg, further explained his vocal issue in a Twitter post Tuesday night, adding that he needs to cancel some of his upcoming stand-up gigs.

“I thought that my vocal cords were healed but according to the doctor, flying 36 hours and hosting a giant concert in South Africa didn’t help me,” he wrote. “So now if I want to get better I have to take it seriously so that I can perform at 100 percent on my new tour next year. I hate cancelling shows but I also hate the idea of losing my voice forever so I’m postponing all this year’s stand up shows and working hard on rehabbing the voice.”

Talk to us

More in Life

Patterns of nature and mythology, by a Northwest master

See new works by Alfredo Arreguín, an originator of the Pattern and Decoration style, in Langley.

Doug Fahl will play Flan Kittregdge in Red Curtain’s live-stream performance of “Six Degrees of Separation.”
Stymied by virus, Red Curtain offers live-streamed theater

The Marysville troupe plans Zoom performances of “Something Rotten!” and “Six Degrees of Separation.”

The mask of an employee who returned to the office during the normalization period after corona virus quarantine, stands in front of the keyboard. Top view. Turkey.
What seniors can expect as new normal in a post-vaccine world

Here’s a preview of post-vaccine life for older Americans, from medical care to grocery shopping.

The bottle was described in the catalog as one of the most unusual figural bottles they had ever auctioned. It was made about 1890. “Seidel C. / Hoflieferanten / Breslau” is on the base. Auction price with premium, $780. (Cowles Syndicate Inc.)
Rare bottle from 1890 shaped like a Prussian military helmet

The 7-inch vessel is made of dark amber glass with a wooden spike and a partial German label. It sold for $780.

The trick to 1892 East’s crispy French toast is a combination of cornflakes and buttery palmiers, which add great crunch and rich flavor. (Bob Chamberlin/Los Angeles Times/MCT)
Is your bread stale? Don’t throw it away; make this treat

Cornflake French toast might seem a bit of a gimmick, but the added crunch is a marvel.

The Washington State Wine Commission is using August, known for decades as Washington Wine Month, to promote the Drink For WA campaign. The commission estimates it will generate 12 million impressions through advertising and social media channels. (Photo courtesy Washington State Wine Commission)
Washington wine commission rolls out Drink for WA campaign

Share an image of your special occasion along with tags of #DrinkForWA and #EatForWA.

It only takes a small amount of cash to build a homemade swamp cooler to make your home comfortable this summer. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Can a do-it-yourself swamp cooler beat the August heat?

Instead of spending $400 for an air conditioner, purchase $25 of simple parts and assemble one yourself.

Fried green tomatoes stand in fro fresh red tomatoes in this BLT sandwich. (Gretchen McKay/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/TNS)
Make a fried green tomato BLT when you can’t wait for ripe

Firmer than red tomatoes, with a zingy, slightly sour taste, unripe tomatoes hold their shape.

Talking to stuffed animals and other lessons of COVID-19

Teddy bears are a source of comfort and can be a sounding board for something we are trying to express.

Most Read