Spooky Mansion performs at Tony V’s Garage at last year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. The surf-soul band from San Francisco will return to the festival to perform May 18 at the Scuttlebutt Taproom Brewery. (Ian Terry / Herald file)

Spooky Mansion performs at Tony V’s Garage at last year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. The surf-soul band from San Francisco will return to the festival to perform May 18 at the Scuttlebutt Taproom Brewery. (Ian Terry / Herald file)

Fisherman’s Village Music Festival expands to Everett Station

This year’s event includes two outdoor stages, an art market, food trucks and a beer garden.

You won’t have to stretch your legs much at this year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival.

Most of the action will revolve around two city blocks when Everett Music Initiative’s event returns for its sixth year May 16-18, headlined by Canadian indie-rock band Wolf Parade and rising Seattle rapper Travis Thompson. In all, about 50 local, regional and national touring acts are slated to perform.

There will only be three stages per night to choose from this year, compared to the past when up to five were jockeying for crowds. That means fewer time conflicts and opportunities to see more musicians, according to Ryan Crowther, the festival’s founder and leader of EMI.

But fewer venues aren’t the only shake-up: The bulk of the festival is moving out of the downtown core and will include two outdoor stages. There’s also the new Night Market, a collection of food trucks, a beer garden, 15 bands and more than 40 art vendors that is free admission.

Crowther said the Night Market, which will take place Friday and Saturday, is meant to be a family-friendly street fair that also provides a sample of what the three-day Fisherman’s festival is like.

“Every year we have to balance creating an experience for locals and creating enough of a draw for someone to want to drive more than 30 miles away to come here,” he said. “This year, I think we’ve really hit that balance well.”

And, after flip-flopping between March and May for years, Crowther said the event will be held in May from here on out. That decision was mostly due to weather, but it also helps that Sasquatch! Music Festival and Upstream Music Fest, which were held around the same time, are no longer happening, he said.

“People only have so many of these weekends in them,” he said.

The 2019 Fisherman’s festival will kick off Thursday with performances by 10 acts at Black Lab Gallery, Narrative Coffee and Schack Art Center downtown, then it moves east to 33rd Street and Cedar Street for Friday and Saturday’s shows.

The new setup of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival includes two outdoor stages, one indoor stage and the “Night Market” featuring vendors, food trucks and a beer garden. (Elizabeth Person)

The new setup of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival includes two outdoor stages, one indoor stage and the “Night Market” featuring vendors, food trucks and a beer garden. (Elizabeth Person)

Crowther said this year’s move closer to Everett Station not only gives the event room to build, but also addresses other lingering issues.

“We need to accommodate growth, and the only way to create a venue that holds more people is to move it outside,” he said. “There are a lot less people living on that side of downtown and, while I believe most people are supportive of these efforts, the noise from music and lots of people creates an impact. That impact is far less of a nuisance down in the Everett Station District.”

Seven food trucks will keep festival-goers from partying on empty stomachs, while Scuttlebutt will be pouring four new brews in the beer garden.

Vendors will set up shop in a large tent along 33rd Street, offering a variety of wares including embroidery, candles, henna tattoos, pottery, jewelry, paintings and bake goods. Everett artist Kimberly Mattson will be painting a mural during the festival.

The Night Market’s lineup of artists and artisans was organized by Kristen Boswell, an Everett artist who owns Vertical Gardens Northwest. Boswell also is the founder of the Everett Makers Market, a pop-up market featuring local artisans.

“At a music festival, sometimes there’s a lag in between acts you want to watch or maybe you still want to linger and pop around and make connections and chat,” she said. “I think that connectivity is going to be huge.”

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

This year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival is May 16-18 in Everett. The May 16 shows will be at Black Lab Gallery, Narrative Coffee and Schack Art Center. On May 17 and 18, the festival will take place at 33rd and Cedar streets, and at Scuttlebutt Taproom & Brewery nearby.

The Night Market is from 4 to 10 p.m. May 17 and noon to 10 p.m. May 18 and will feature more than 40 art vendors, seven food trucks, a beer garden and 15 bands performing on an outdoor stage.

Tickets, $79 each for three full days of live music, can be purchased online at www.everettmusicinitiative.org and www.thefishermansvillage.com.

Talk to us

More in Life

Washington’s most beloved state park turns 100

Deception Pass State Park, which draws as many visitors as the best-known national parks in the U.S., celebrates a century of recreation and conservation

Kid 'n Play members Christopher "Kid" Reid, left, and Christopher "Play" Martin perform on NBC's "Today" show during the "I Love The 90's" morning concert at Rockefeller Plaza on Friday, April 29, 2016, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

Relive the music of the 1990s with Kid N Play and other stars of the era at the Tulalip Casino Amphitheater.

Contestant chef Brian Madayag (left) of Edmonds and West Coast team captain Brooke Williamson on “Beachside Brawl.” (Food Network) 20220616
Edmonds chef reps Pacific Northwest on new Food Network show

Barkada owner Brian Madayaga will compete on a new Food Network series that premiers Sunday.

After two years of wellness, Covid finally hit this family, but thanks to vaccinations, the symptoms were mild. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Jennifer Bardsley’s fighting COVID-19 with vaccines and TLC

But even with vaccinations, the disease is scary for people like her with less than robust immune systems.

Turkey vultures’ pervious nostrils are among the features that help them feed on carrion. (The Columbian files)
In praise of turkey vultures, nature’s cleaning service

These raptors should be revered, not reviled, for their disposal of stinky, disease-laden animal matter.

close-up of gardener's hands planting a tomato seedling in the vegetable garden
This summer, it’s smart to go big or go home at the nursery

When buying annuals, vegetables or perennials, go for the 1-gallon pots. And don’t skimp on the soil amendments and plant food.

Writing on Belfast's Peace Wall.
Rick Steves’ Europe: Europe tears down walls — and builds bridges

The walls of antiquity — and of the Cold War — were symbols not of strength, but of mistrust and insecurity.

Coming home for the summer: Your college student and you

It can be tough going and conflicts will arise, but don’t worry, parents — they’ll be back in school soon.

He booked his JetBlue tickets on Orbitz. Now they’re gone

When Benjamin Eckstein shows up at the airport for his flight from Boston to San Jose, his airline says he doesn’t have a ticket. Whose fault is this mess, and how does he clean it up?

Musicians Rod Argent, left, Hugh Grundy, Chris White, and Colin Blunstone of The Zombies attends the 2019 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony at the Barclays Center on Friday, March 29, 2019, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

Get your tickets now to see rock Hall of Famers The Zombies in Everett. Plus there’s a month of music planned in Langley.

dsfy
Celebrate national pollination week

This year, the week of June 20-26 is National Pollination Week and… Continue reading

The GPP for this Friday is Clematis 'Rooguchi' and the image credit goes to Richie Steffen.
Great Plant Pick: Clematis ‘Rooguchi’

This charming, non-twining vine is ideal for tight situations, and does well in a container.