Body found Thursday at Oso slide is that of Steven Hadaway

OSO — It took more than 60 days — nearly 1,500 hours — to bring Steven Hadaway home.

And his family is forever grateful.

John Hadaway learned Friday that the body found the day before in the Oso debris fields was his brother.

On a rainy Saturday morning, Hadaway met with a Snohomish County sheriff’s deputy in an Everett parking lot. The two had talked by phone many times before and finally met. The deputy handed him his brother’s wedding ring. John Hadaway hugged and thanked him. He then drove to Darrington to give it to his sister-in-law, Margaret Hadaway.

“It meant a ton to her,” he said.

Steven and Margaret Hadaway were married for more than 30 years.

Hadaway is the 42nd confirmed death from the March 22 mudslide that wiped out the Steelhead Haven neighborhood and buried Highway 530. That leaves one person reported missing: Kris Regelbrugge, 44. The body of her husband, John Regelbrugge III, 49, an active-duty Navy commander, previously had been found.

In school, 42 out of 43 would be a terrific grade, but in the Oso disaster, it simply isn’t good enough, John Hadaway said.

“I still don’t believe a car should go down 530 until she has been found,” said Hadaway, who spent time with his brother, Frank, as volunteers searching the rubble. “Her family needs to be whole, just like everyone else. It’s time. It’s time she comes home. She is the first priority now.”

Steven Hadaway, 53, was installing a satellite dish at a home on Steelhead Drive when the slide hit. A track of his rig’s GPS showed he arrived at the job at 8:15 a.m. The mudslide hit at 10:37 a.m.

John Hadaway found symbolism in the timing of his brother being found. As a young man, Hadaway enlisted in the Marines Corps.

“He came home on Memorial Day weekend,” he said.

Steven Hadaway and his wife were foster parents before adopting three children — a boy with special needs and two girls. Their son, Brandon, could neither walk nor talk when he died in 2000. He was 6, and in the first grade.

Steven Hadaway moved to Darrington seven years ago because he loved small towns. He’d text his brothers pictures of Whitehorse Mountain and the natural beauty that surrounds the town to try to make them jealous.

The Hadaways always figured their brother would want to be the last one found, to make sure others came out first.

Perhaps, John Hadaway likes to imagine, his brother figured it was time to be found to bring new energy to finding Regelbrugge.

“My heart still breaks,” he said. “She has a family. They need her home.”

Eric Stevick: 425-339-3446, stevick@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Local News

The entrance to the new free COVID vaccination site at the Everett Mall on Monday, Jan. 17, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Free mass-vaccination site opens Tuesday at Everett Mall

Hundreds of appointments are up for grabs at the state-run site, which will offer initial doses, boosters and pediatric shots.

Michael Jensen, left, and Nathan Jensen, right, pick up trash in their encampment that they being forced to clear out of by Parks Department the near Silver Lake on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Annual homeless count could shed light on pandemic’s impact

Snohomish County canceled its 2021 point-in-time count. Officials hope this year’s will bring clarity.

Marysville Pilchuck student Gianna Frank and Marysville firefighters bag puzzles and snacks in Marysville, Washington on January 17, 2022. (Isabella Breda / The Herald)
In Marysville, care packages filled in an MLK act of service

Some bags will go to seniors, some to survivors of domestic violence and some to those living with housing insecurity.

Index School (Index School District)
Voters to decide fate of critical school funding measures

Levies to pay for staff and programs are on the Feb. 8 ballot in districts across Snohomish County.

A crew member carries plywood to steathe a roof as of the Home Repair Service Program Friday morning in Brier, Washington on January 14, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Habitat for Humanity program helps Brier homeowners stay put

The nonprofit’s Home Repair Service program gave a senior couple a new roof — and hope.

Snohomish County Courthouse. (Herald file)
Lawmakers consider Snohomish County request for 2 more judges

It’s been 15 years since the Legislature approved a new Superior Court judge for the county.

NO CAPTION NECESSARY: Logo for the Cornfield Report by Jerry Cornfield. 20200112
Ports and potties, and a delay in long-term-care payroll tax

Here’s what’s happening on Day 8 of the 2022 session of the Washington Legislature.

A mail carrier delivers mail along Dubuque Road in Snohomish on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Mail delays frustrate and perplex Snohomish residents

One woman waited two weeks for delivery. Then came “an avalanche of mail.” The Postal Service blames snow and staffing issues.

Sam Dawson administers a collection swab herself Thursday afternoon at the walk-up COVID testing center on Wetmore Ave in Everett, Washington on January 13, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Sketchy firm’s COVID-test sites shut down as questions mount

The Center for COVID Control will close an Everett site and others around the U.S. as officials take a closer look.

Most Read