Henry M. Jackson’s name endures around the region

To get a sense of the breadth of Henry M. Jackson’s legacy, consider the diversity of places bearing his name.

It’s on a high school in Mill Creek, a public square in Jerusalem, a visitor’s center at Mount Rainier and a United States Navy submarine.

You’ll also find Jackson’s name on a plaza at Naval Station Everett, a playground in Manhattan, and a national wilderness in east Snohomish County.

There’s even a Henry M. Jackson Society at Cambridge University in Great Britain. “It’s not where you’re from but the ideas that you represent that are important,” said Alan Mendoza, who is a founder of the group of political conservatives.

Roughly two dozen buildings, parks and institutions carry the Everett lawmaker’s moniker as a lasting tribute.

Here is a rundown of some of those places.

Henry M. Jackson Foundation, established in Seattle in 1983, is guided in part by Jackson family members to “continue the unfinished work” of the late senator. It provides grants to nonprofit and educational institutions working in the areas of international affair, education, human rights, environment and natural resources management, and public service.

Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, a private not-for-profit organization established by a 1983 law signed by President Ronald Reagan. Jackson sponsored the bill to create this group, which is not connected to the grant-making foundation.

Henry M. Jackson Park at 1700 State St. in Everett covers 14 acres and includes baseball and soccer fields, plus a playground and basketball hoops.

Henry M. Jackson playground in Manhattan, New York City.

Henry M. Jackson Square in Jerusalem.

Henry M. Jackson Wilderness designated in 1984 is a 103,297-acre region bordered by the Glacier Peak Wilderness to the north and the Wild Sky Wilderness to the southwest.

Henry M. Jackson Visitor Center at Mount Rainier National Park. Originally known as the Paradise Visitor Center, the building was renamed in 1987.

Henry M. Jackson Overlook and exhibit on the south slope of Mount Finlayson in San Juan Island National Historical Park.

Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek, completed in 1994.

Henry M. Jackson plaza at Naval Station Everett.

Henry M. Jackson Conference Center at Everett Community College. The center was dedicated Sept. 7, 1967, with Jackson the featured speaker at the ceremony.

USS Henry M. Jackson, an Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine launched Oct. 15, 1983, and commissioned a year later. It is the only Ohio-class submarine not named after a U.S. state.

The Jackson Federal Building in Seattle, also known as the JFB, opened in 1974. It was rededicated and named for the senator in 1984.

Henry M. Jackson Hydroelectric Project, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1. Located on the Sultan River, the project began operations in 1984.

Henry M. Jackson Apartments in Seattle house low-income individuals and families, many of whom pay with federally issued Section 8 vouchers.

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington campus in Seattle.

Henry M. Jackson Endowed Fellowship in the Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington.

Henry M. Jackson Professorship at the UW Law School.

Henry M. Jackson internship for the National Bureau of Asian Research.

Henry M. Jackson Distinguished Service Award from the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINSA). In 1982, JINSA awarded its first “Distinguished Service Award” to Jackson. Following his death, the group renamed the award to honor his memory.

Henry Jackson Society at Cambridge University, England, a self-described cross-partisan think tank devoted to issues such as constitutional democracy, human rights and foreign policy.

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