New 116th interchange enters final phase

The Tulalip-led project will ease backups at the I-5 overpass.

A new interchange at 116th Street NE and I-5 is entering its fourth and final phase of construction. Some ramp and lane closures in the southbound and northbound lanes are expected to occur overnight starting this week.

This is a $62 million project led by the Tulalip Tribes, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Transportation, as well as the Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Snohomish County and Marysville.

Construction began in 2015 and has proceeded since then in phases.

For this final phase, the existing diamond ramps will be realigned into a “single-point urban interchange,” a configuration that allows more drivers to turn in a single cycle by using one signal to control all crossing traffic. Along with the traffic signal, new lighting will be added. Crews also will do stormwater and landscaping work, lay down pavement markings, add signage and improve water and sewer infrastructure.

The new overpass will accommodate six lanes of traffic, plus space for pedestrians and bicycles, and is expected to reduce gridlock at a location where 25,000 vehicles per day get off the freeway — one-quarter of all traffic that travels that stretch of I-5.

When all is said and done, project planners expect to see accidents cut in half and rush-hour delays reduced to under 1 minute by 2042. Rush-hour delays now are in the 10-minute range.

Have a question? Email streetsmarts@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Report: Man had knife when he charged, was shot by deputies

When Snohomish County sheriff’s deputies shot and killed a man… Continue reading

At earlier-defiant Flower World, workers now wear masks

The owner, however, has said he will legally challenge the governor’s order requiring face coverings.

‘Not a safe situation’: County is evicting homeless campers

Residents of the Everett tent city aren’t sure what’s next. Operations at local shelters have been curtailed.

Community Transit CEO announces he will retire

Emmett Heath has led the transit agency for six years after being hired from within.

Dispute between ex-housemates leads to shooting in Sultan

Two men had a disagreement over a truck. A confrontation ensued. Then one allegedly shot the other.

Community Transit drivers: Too soon to open the front doors

The agency gives drivers masks, but a union calls that insufficient and asks for more protections.

Volunteers prove vital to county’s fight against COVID-19

Snohomish County’s Medical Reserve Corps provides a chance to help during the pandemic.

Everett man charged in assault that sent toddler to hospital

According to doctors, the 18-month-old girl apparently was strangled and hit in the head.

Most Read