Shea Parker finishes trim for Spada Farmhouse Brewery’s new location on First Street in Snohomish. (Aaron Swaney)

Shea Parker finishes trim for Spada Farmhouse Brewery’s new location on First Street in Snohomish. (Aaron Swaney)

Drink This: Snohomish brewery making big move to First Street

Spada Farmhouse Brewery aims for more customers at the new location, where it will add food service.

Spada Farmhouse Brewery will soon be moving to First Street in downtown Snohomish. It’s a huge move for the small craft brewery, which focuses on sours and barrel-aged beers.

Owner John Spada is using quarantine time to renovate the building, which formerly housed Stewart’s Place Tavern.

“I’m really excited for the opportunity for growth,” said Spada, whose taproom until recently was just up from First Street on Union Avenue in downtown Snohomish. “I think it’ll be an opportunity to attract a wider base of customers.”

First Street is coveted real estate because of its antique shops and restaurants.

“The majority of foot traffic in Snohomish is on First Street,” Spada said. “It was tough being off First Street because it really cuts down on that foot traffic.”

Spada said they had been looking for two years for a spot that could house both the brewery and taproom on First Street, but that the real estate market for that type of building is very competitive. Not only was First Street desirable, but Spada was looking to keep distance between his brewery and the five others in Snohomish.

So when Spada found out Stewart’s was leaving, he jumped at the opportunity. Spada has since closed its former spot on Union Avenue and is now putting all of its energy into building out and renovating the new space.

The First Street location is spacious enough to allow Spada to move brewing production on site. Spada’s sour and barrel-aging program, however, will remain on the family farm outside of Snohomish to ensure the separation of clean and sour beer.

The move also will enable Spada to add food service. The kitchen will be run by his friend Tyler Stocker, who was one of the original owners of the Trail’s End Taproom and has run his own catering and food truck businesses.

“The menu will be unique and will complement the beer,” Spada said. “Tyler and I work really well together.”

Spada, who is well-known for making great sour beers, said that the brewery will also feature a few more approachable beers to expand its customer base.

The schedule for opening the new space is dependent on Gov. Jay Inslee’s stay-home order. Spada said they hope to be ready by the time the order is lifted, and that they’ll use the easing of restrictions as a soft opening for the brewery.

Aaron Swaney also blogs about craft beer for The Spilt Pint at www.spiltpint.com.

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