A section of Whitehorse Regional Trail is closed due landslide in Darrington. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

A section of Whitehorse Regional Trail is closed due landslide in Darrington. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Much work remains to be done on 27-mile Whitehorse Trail

Snohomish County’s regional trail from Arlington to Darrington was interrupted by slides and washouts.

Trails are busy this year.

As I’ve mentioned in this column before, a lot of other entertainment and recreation isn’t available — or if it is, people are wary in the midst of the pandemic.

via GIPHY

But like Ian Malcolm fatefully said in “Jurassic Park” about life, we’re all finding a way. For thousands of people it’s meant biking, blading, scooting, skating and walking more than last year.

That’s great, even when it further popularizes well-tread places like the Centennial Trail.

But there also was some unfortunate timing by nature for another idyllic path in Snohomish County.

“Is the Whitehorse Trail open from the Arlington side?” Arlington resident Jon Annis asked The Daily Herald a few months ago.

Sorry for the extended delay, Jon.

I call it an exercise in practiced patience, which will be necessary for people hoping to travel the full length of Snohomish County’s Whitehorse Regional Trail.

The Stilly connection needs a little work.

A pair of natural events blocked and damaged parts of the Whitehorse Regional Trail — 27 mostly paved miles between Arlington and Darrington. It generally parallels Highway 530.

In 2014, the Stilly Valley area was devastated by the Oso mudslide that killed 43 people. A memorial was erected along Whitehorse Trail, which passes the site, near the former entrance to Steelhead Drive. Further monuments are planned.

The land’s steep slopes remain a slide risk, according to information from the Snohomish County Department of Emergency Management and Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

Fellow cyclist and former Herald editor Aaron Swaney wrote, “The intersection of decay and rebirth along the Fortson Mill section of the Whitehorse Trail is hard to ignore,” after biking on the path a few years ago when it was getting ready to reopen in full again. He also described it as “a hike on a bike.”

I can’t comment on it as I’ve yet to pedal that way on my Trek, though I’m not sure my road bike tires are ready for the compacted gravel put down by the county this year on parts of the trail.

A landslide also closed Whitehorse two miles east of the Centennial Trail intersection in Arlington and west of the Trafton trailhead. Snohomish County Parks staff don’t know what caused the slide, but hope to receive a grant to pay for a geotechnical engineer to evaluate the site, propose a solution and cover repair expenses. That would happen over the coming two years.

A washout by the North Fork Stillaguamish River’s natural movement took out part of the trail’s east end, just west of 435th Avenue NE and about three miles west from Darrington. The county plans to create a bypass through this area.

“Snohomish County Parks staff have applied for grants and are working with adjacent landowners for a possible trail reroute,” county spokesperson Rose Smith said in an email.

People aren’t supposed to try to cross the closed sections, though it seems some do despite signs warning of slide danger and telling trail users “DO NOT ENTER.”

These sections of the Whitehorse Trail are likely off limits for the next year or two, Smith said.

Until the county can repair or officially reroute those parts of the trail, people should plan to travel between the closures or venture onto Highway 530/Arlington-Darrington Road to circumvent those stretches.

You know, find a way.

Have a question? Email streetsmarts@heraldnet.com. Please include your first and last name and city of residence.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Marysville firefighters respond to a 12-year-old boy who fell down a well Tuesday May 30, 2023 in Marysville, Washington. (Photo provided by Marysville Fire District)
Marysville firefighters save boy who fell 20 feet into well

The 12-year-old child held himself up by grabbing on to a plastic pipe while firefighters worked to save him.

Highway 9 is set to be closed in both directions for a week as construction crews build a roundabout at the intersection with Vernon Road. (Washington State Department of Transportation)
Weeklong closure coming to Highway 9 section in Lake Stevens

Travelers should expect delays or find another way from Friday to Thursday between Highway 204 and Lundeen Parkway.

Students arriving off the bus get in line to score some waffles during a free pancake and waffle breakfast at Lowell Elementary School on Friday, May 26, 2023, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
800 free pancakes at Everett’s Lowell Elementary feed the masses

The annual breakfast was started to connect the community and the school, as well as to get people to interact.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring speaks at the groundbreaking event for the I-5/SR 529 Interchange project on Tuesday, May 23, 2023 in Marysville, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
$123M project starting on Highway 529 interchange, I-5 HOV lane

A reader wondered why the highway had a lane closure despite not seeing work done. Crews were waiting on the weather.

Justin Bell was convicted earlier this month of first-degree assault for a December 2017 shooting outside a Value Village in Everett. (Caleb Hutton / Herald file)
Court: Snohomish County jurors’ opaque masks didn’t taint verdict

During the pandemic, Justin Bell, 32, went on trial for a shooting. Bell claims his right to an impartial jury was violated.

Gary Fontes uprights a tree that fell over in front of The Fontes Manor — a miniature handmade bed and breakfast — on Friday, May 12, 2023, at his home near Silver Lake in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Everett’s mini-Frank Lloyd Wright builds neighborhood of extra tiny homes

A tiny lighthouse, a spooky mansion and more: Gary Fontes’ miniature world of architectural wonders is one-twelfth the size of real life.

Will Steffener
Inslee appoints Steffener as Superior Court judge

Attorney Will Steffener will replace Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Janice Ellis, who is retiring in June.

Panelists from different areas of mental health care speak at the Herald Forum about mental health care on Wednesday, May 31, 2023 in Snohomish, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
At panel, mental health experts brainstorm answers to staff shortages

Workforce shortages, insurance coverage and crisis response were in focus at the Snohomish forum hosted by The Daily Herald.

Marysville
Police: Marysville man fist-bumped cop, exposing tattoos of wanted robber

The suspect told police he robbed three stores to pay off a drug debt. He’d just been released from federal prison for another armed robbery.

Most Read