Proposed pay hikes for politicians are Eyman’s newest target

If a citizen panel approves the raises in February, Eyman vows to pursue a referendum to repeal them.

OLYMPIA — Tim Eyman doesn’t think state lawmakers, judges and executives like the governor deserve the pay raises proposed for them by a panel of volunteers.

So the Mukilteo initiative promoter is making plans to block them from taking effect next year.

On Wednesday, Eyman will outline a strategy that essentially puts the Washington Citizens’ Commission on Salaries for Elected Officials on notice that if it approves its recommended pay hikes in February as scheduled, he will seek to repeal their decision with a referendum.

Though he can’t gather signatures, Eyman is using a web page and newly designed T-shirts to promote his message of “Give Them Nothing!”.

“I think this will be a really important battle,” Eyman said.

On Oct. 10, the panel of 16 volunteers adopted a proposed schedule of raises for the state’s 147 lawmakers, nine statewide executives and hundreds of judges elected to seats in district and superior courts, courts of appeal, and the Supreme Court.

Pay hikes would take effect on July 1, 2019 and July 1. 2020.

Under the proposal, increases over the two-year period range from 6.6 percent for Gov. Jay Inslee to 13 percent for Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib to 17.6 percent for lawmakers. Judges would see their pay climb by 12.7 percent next year and 5.1 percent in 2020.

Commissioners will hold hearings on recommendations in Spokane in November, Vancouver in December, and Silverdale in January. A final hearing is set for Feb. 4 in Olympia at which the commission could revise the schedule before taking final action.

Eyman said he and others will be showing up at the hearings to oppose the increases and be ready to get signatures soon after Feb. 4.

The proposal and contact information for the panel can be found online at https://salaries.wa.gov/.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@herald net.com. Twitter: @dospueblos.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times Carol Johnston has watched this Pacific madrone grow for the past 14 years. It is slated to be removed during McDonald’s upcoming renovation in early February.
Madrone tree to make way for bigger McDonald’s in Oak Harbor

Despite being named a Tree City USA, the city has no special protection in place for the native tree.

Democrats in the Washington State House are proposing to pay for transportation improvements partly by raising the gas tax by 18 cents. (Andrea Brown / Herald file)
Gas tax increase part of Dems’ massive transportation package

An 18-cent gas tax hike and a fee on carbon emissions would raise $25.8 billion for new roads and more.

Navy seeks to conduct SEAL training in Whidbey, Camano parks

The deadline to register to participate in public comment is 5 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 22.

Driver jumps from truck in Lynnwood, leaving son to crash

The boy was taken to a local hospital with minor scrapes. His father is in the Snohomish County Jail.

Light rail work to close northbound I-5 in Mountlake Terrace

The overnight closures will happen late Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Jill Johnson (left) and Greg Banks
State’s vaccine schedule draws criticism from Island County

Gov. Jay Inslee’s new plan for vaccinations didn’t include a change for disabled people.

Grant program reopens for businesses suffering amid pandemic

Local businesses that haven’t applied to Snohomish County’s “R3” program can do so until Feb. 2.

The strip-mall site (bottom) where Trent Development hopes to build 350 studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments, on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2020 in Lynnwood, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Hundreds more apartments planned around Lynnwood light rail

In a new proposal, a developer envisions 350 units, two buildings of at least seven stories, a one-acre courtyard and a dog spa.

Most Read