Bruce Hallenbeck, 4, picks out Honeycrisp apples for his family at Swans Trail Farms on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022 in Snohomish, Washington. The farm is now closed for the season. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Bruce Hallenbeck, 4, picks out Honeycrisp apples for his family at Swans Trail Farms on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022 in Snohomish, Washington. The farm is now closed for the season. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Study: Washington residents would pay more for homegrown goods

Local online shoppers are on the look out for the made in Washington label.

Washington residents are willing to pay top dollar when they shop online for homegrown goods, according to a new study.

In fact, Evergreen state residents are willing to pay a 31% premium for made in Washington products, according to a survey of 3,000 Washingtonians by HostingAdvice, a web hosting service.

Hawaii residents took the No. 1 spot with a willingness to spend up to 35% more for items made on the islands, followed by Utah with 32%, the report said.

New Yorkers are the least willing to pay a premium. The survey found they’d only spend an extra 8% for locally made products.

Washington’s willingness to pay more for homegrown goods, 31%, tied with Connecticut and West Virginia.

A 2020 study by the Reshoring Institute revealed that nearly 70% of respondents preferred American-made products. More than 83% were willing to pay up to 20% more for domestic products, according to Reshoring, a nonprofit that promotes American manufacturing.

HostingAdvice sought to delve further with a state-by-state survey looking into how much of a premium people would pay for products produced and sold online by businesses in their state.

The survey also found 32% of online shoppers specifically search for locally made products, while 40% do so occasionally.

On the other hand, 28% said they don’t consider a product’s origin and opt for the best option regardless of where it was made, the report said.

Consumers are most willing to pay a premium for locally made products, in order of preference:

• Health and beauty products;

• Clothing and apparel;

• Cars and car parts;

• Electronics;

• Home appliances;

• Furniture and home decor;

• Food and beverages, such as specialty foods and craft beer;

• Sporting goods and outdoor equipment;

• Children’s products, including toys and clothing;

• Jewelry and accessories; and

• Construction materials.

Janice Podsada: 425-339-3097; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @JanicePods.

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