From the top of 21st Street at Rucker Ave, Everett teacher Monica Darby-Agustin stands with her dogs Binka (back) and Bernie watching her two kids sled and play in the snow with other kids early Monday following a heavy snowfall overnight that left the region blanketed and forced numerous school closures. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

From the top of 21st Street at Rucker Ave, Everett teacher Monica Darby-Agustin stands with her dogs Binka (back) and Bernie watching her two kids sled and play in the snow with other kids early Monday following a heavy snowfall overnight that left the region blanketed and forced numerous school closures. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Snow day for students, governments; bad drive for commuters

Several school districts announced Tuesday cancellations. The morning commute could be affected.

EVERETT — Bundled in a scarf, hat and coat, Peggy Kurtz walked through a snowy Grand Avenue Park on Monday morning with her Airedale terrier Woody, who was sniffing at the 7 inches of drift.

Everett Community College was closed, so Kurtz stayed home from her job teaching for the music department. She said her snow day plans included exploring a monochromatic north Everett with Woody.

“Fortunately it’s still not that cold,” she said.

A storm overnight left more than half a foot of snow in places, causing school closures and making travel difficult for many.

Transportation officials on Monday urged people to stay home and off the I-5 corridor.

Freeways were snow-covered and there were frequent spinouts. As of late afternoon, the Washington State Patrol responded to 147 crashes in Snohomish County. No serious injuries were reported.

Temperatures hovered around 25 degrees throughout the day. And with freezing temperatures predicted to continue, little melting of the snow is likely. That could make for a slippery commute Tuesday as the wet roads ice over.

At 4 p.m. Monday, the National Weather Service in Seattle was predicting a sunny Tuesday with highs reaching 34 degrees in some parts of the county and lows dipping just below freezing. More snow is in the forecast starting Thursday.

With Abbe Balka on his back, Devin Keeler tries to get air off a jump while snowboarding Monday, Feb. 4, at Jennings Park in Marysville. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

With Abbe Balka on his back, Devin Keeler tries to get air off a jump while snowboarding Monday, Feb. 4, at Jennings Park in Marysville. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Many government services, including city halls, also closed for the day. The Snohomish County offices closed early and weren’t planning on reopening to the public until 10 a.m. Tuesday. Bus systems were running snow routes.

There was one place in Western Washington where it was not snowing — and never will: Inside the new Highway 99 tunnel under downtown Seattle, which opened to commuters Monday morning.

In Everett, a “closed for snow” sign hung on the door to Goldfinch Brothers on Rucker Avenue, but director of operations Kurt Willows still shoveled the store’s walkway.

“Just for the people needing to get in and out today,” he said.

Kurt Willows, director of operations at Everett’s Goldfinch Brothers, shovels the store’s walkway for employees Monday. The store was closed to the public. (Julia-Grace Sanders / The Herald)

Kurt Willows, director of operations at Everett’s Goldfinch Brothers, shovels the store’s walkway for employees Monday. The store was closed to the public. (Julia-Grace Sanders / The Herald)

Some cities, like Everett, don’t have dedicated snow plows. Instead six dump trucks are outfitted with snow removal equipment, officials said.

Crews are working 12-hour shifts which run 24 hours a day until the need subsides.

Plowing focuses first on major arterials and key secondary routes that support transit and emergency services, and on a small number of steep residential streets that lack alternative access.

The roads were mostly empty in Everett’s Bayside neighborhood Monday morning, with only an occasional car inching past.

Kinley Stonehocker makes a snow angel Monday morning while on a walk with her mom, Shannon Stonehocker, in Everett’s Bayside neighborhood. (Julia-Grace Sanders / The Herald)

Kinley Stonehocker makes a snow angel Monday morning while on a walk with her mom, Shannon Stonehocker, in Everett’s Bayside neighborhood. (Julia-Grace Sanders / The Herald)

Shannon Stonehocker walked through fresh powder on Grand Avenue with her 4-year-old daughter, Kinley, stopping for snow angels along the way.

Their snow day plans?

“Pretty much this,” Stonehocker said.

The National Weather Service in Seattle reported these accumulations at 6 a.m: Marysville, 8 inches; Everett, Lake Stevens and Arlington, 7 inches; Lynnwood, 6 inches; and Edmonds, 5 inches.

Reporter Lizz Giordano contributed to this story. Julia-Grace Sanders: 425-339-3439. jgsanders@heraldnet.com.

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