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Published: Sunday, July 1, 2012, 12:15 a.m.

Mariners Notebook: Wedge, players meet behind closed doors

SEATTLE -- The Seattle Mariners clubhouse, which is normally open to media before batting practice, was closed before Saturday night's game for a team meeting.
The meeting was called by manager Eric Wedge one night after Boston's Aaron Cook hurled a two-hit complete game shutout, using just 81 pitches.
"I called the meeting," Wedge said. "What happened last night was unacceptable. It's as simple as that."
Wedge didn't mince words after Friday's loss, saying 'that was horrible.' And he appeared just as salty before Saturday's game.
"The level of play, at this level, that I expect has to be better than that. I just made sure that they understand that, in not so many words, what's important and what should be important, what their priorities are and what they should be and just about the way we are going to go about our business. Whether it be young players trying to figure it out or older players who are supposed to be doing better, whether you are playing every day or not playing every day -- I don't give a damn. What we do is we come out to the ballpark and we play with a championship presence and we work towards being a championship team and we are going to find out just who the hell wants to be a part of it."
Wedge didn't name any names, but the message came across clearly.
"You've got to play every day like it's your last," Wedge said. "And some of these people out here, they need to be playing every day like it's their last."
Wedge talked about not just the player's performance, but their approach to how they play the game and commitment.
"The bottom line is what we do here on a daily basis is important," he said. "It's important. If this isn't one of the three most important things in your life than you should go do something else."
Guti watch
Outfielder Franklin Gutierrez was placed on the 7-day concussion disabled list before Friday night's loss to Boston after being hit in the head by a throw to first base in Thursday's 1-0 victory over the Red Sox.
The Mariners recalled relief pitcher Steve Delabar to take Gutierrez's spot on the roster.
Wedge said that Gutierrez is still experiencing some headaches and made no guarantees when he would return.
"The headaches are better, but he's still off," Wedge said. "There is no guarantees after seven days that he is going to be healthy.
"Obviously we are going to be very careful."
Don't mess with Charlie
One of the bright spots for the Seattle Mariners this season has been relief pitcher Charlie Furbush. He is one of a handful of players that has been mentioned as a possible representative for the Mariners in the 2012 All-Star game in Kansas City.
With a glance at Furbush's statistics, it's not hard to understand why.
After Saturday night's game, Furbush had gone 222/3 consecutive innings without allowing a run, the third longest streak in club history. Shigetoshi Hasegawa set the record of 28 2/3 innings in 2003.
That isn't the only Mariner record that Furbush is threatening. He has also recorded at least one strikeout in his past 18 appearances through Saturday's game. That streak ranks fourth in Mariners history. The record of 22 was set by Joel Pineiro.
Quick hits
After Saturday's game, right fielder Ichiro Suzuki remains a home run shy of 100 for his major league career. His next home run will make him the 12th player in Mariners history to surpass 100 home runs ... The Mariners have held a lead in 21 of their 46 losses this season, which leads the major leagues ... Kyle Seager came into Saturday's game tied for first in the American League with 24 two-out RBI ... Shortstop Brendan Ryan, who was not in the starting lineup on Saturday, is second among American League shortstops with a .993 fielding percentage.
Story tags » Mariners

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