The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions
Herald staff | jloerch@heraldnet.com
Published: Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 1:12 p.m.

How to protect your plants during cold weather

You bet your bippy it is freezing out there. It was all the way down to 19 degrees the other night and that is when I really start to get a little anxious. For the most part, as long as the mercury stays above 20 degrees at night and close to or above freezing during the day, my plants will do just fine. Drop below that threshold and I start to see damage on plants, especially those that are in containers. Here is why.

Hardiness ratings for plants are based on the minimum temperature the top of a plant can stand before it starts to display damage. What happens underground is a whole different story. For plants in our landscapes the soil temperatures rarely go below freezing except for maybe the top 2-3 inches and even then it is usually just for a few days. But when plants are in containers or raised planters, the soil mass is much more exposed and often as not can freeze solid, resulting in root damage. This is where many container plants bite it. Once the roots are frozen, the plant will usually die a slow death even though the tops may look just fine. What can we do to minimize damage to our container or landscape plants when it gets so cold?

Well, being prepared by watching the weather forecast is the first thing. Moving containers close to the house or even into an unheated garage is helpful. Wrapping the pots and plants with an insulation blanket is very helpful. We sell a mesh material that insulates but also breathes which is important. One material I really like is a quarter inch thick bubble wrap that is lined on both sides with foil. I will wrap pots and trunks and leave it on all winter as long as the top of the plants are exposed. You can also buy frost blankets that are sewn together into little tents which are handy to place over a plant, again for the entire winter if necessary. Avoid plastic garbage bags either clear or black. They do not breathe and if the sun comes out they will cook anything inside the bag.

The other step in frost protection is to make sure our plants are well watered. We might not normally think of this in the dead of the winter but conifers and broadleaf evergreens use a lot of water -- even in the winter. If the soil is dry (perhaps because a plant or pot is under the eves or the canopy of the plant sheds water so it doesn't get into the pot) then we really need to watch the moisture in the soil. Most freeze damage is the result of desiccation. You can also spray the foliage of plants with a product called Wilt Proof that will minimize moisture loss.

Finally, when plants are frozen, it is best not to handle them too much. In the case of lawns, simply stay off of them. With bushes, try not to rough them up any more than you have to when installing a frost cover or watering. Frozen tissue breaks easily rather than bending.

I am sure we will have a few more very cold nights and days before spring arrives so be ready for action. Water ahead of cold weather and have your frost blankets ready to install. And then don't forget to take them off once it warms up!

Steve Smith is owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached online at info@sunnysidenursery.net.
Story tags » Gardening

Sign up for HeraldNet headlines Newsletter
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent Mudrakers posts

No recent blog posts for the past 180 days.

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...
» More life