Schools Notebook for July 25

  • Tue Jul 24th, 2012 6:37pm

Student art on display

The Edmonds Arts Commission presents a display of color photographs and sculpture pieces by Meadowdale and Edmonds-Woodway high school students in the Young Artists Display Case at the Frances Anderson Center, 700 Main St., through Sept. 4.

The display case is at next to the elevator. Public building hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays.

Students Merissa Benedict, Keum Katie and Devin Wilkening were instructed by Jill Van Berkom in Meadowdale High School’s digital photography class. Devin Glover, Karina Martinez and Brian Pham were instructed by D’Arcie Beytebiere in Meadowdale’s sculpture class.

Adrian Andsejowiee, Michelle Cho, Laura Hune and Rachael Southworth were instructed by Amanda Wood in Edmonds-Woodway High School’s sculpture class.

Arts classes in Edmonds

Below is the line up of arts classes and camps for kids and teens at ARTspot, 408 Main St., Edmonds:

• “Sky, Land and Sea: A look at our own backyard,” 10 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays, Aug. 13-17*, ages 8-12, $320: Students will use a variety of mediums to create unusual and unique pieces of art with a focus on native flora, fauna and even a little Edmonds history.

• “Play with Clay,” noon-3 p.m. July 28, ages 7-12, $50: Kids learn some of the basics of hand-building as they make and decorate one or two pieces.

• “Fabric Art Portraits,” 6-9 p.m. Aug. 7 and 9, age 15 and up as well as adults, $90: Teens (maybe with a parent in tow) can make portraits of themselves or an “alter ego” with fabric collage.

• “An Afternoon with Clay,” 1-4 p.m. Aug. 18, ages 12 and up, $50: Sculpture class focusing on hand-building techniques.

• “Tribal Art,” 1-2:30 p.m. Aug. 6-8, teens, $105: Teens can tattoo their T-shirt or sneakers as they learn to express themselves with Sharpies in a decorative, “Urban Tribal” style that includes symbols and curly-Qs and graffiti style lettering.

• “Build it! Draw it! Paint it!,” 1-5 p.m. Aug. 20-24, ages 8-13, $265: A week of exploration with a variety of materials.

Learn more at www.ARTspotEdmonds.com or call 425-640-6408.

Street Strut gets makeover

The Edmonds Public Schools Foundation’s well attended Street Strut 5k race is getting a brand new look and name. Now called the Celebrate Schools 5k Run/Walk, the Oct. 13 race will be held at Alderwood mall.

Other features of the fundraiser remain the same, including the timed race, cheer squads, ice cream truck and live music. All proceeds will continue to go to the foundation’s classroom grants.

“Moving the race to Alderwood mall takes us back to our roots – where our first fundraising run/walk started,” board President Christi Flynn said in a statement. “The name, ‘Celebrate Schools,’ really captures what the Edmonds Public Schools Foundation is all about.”

Learn more at www.edmondspsf.org.

Shoreline launches Virtual College

A former Edmonds Community College worker is the new director of Shoreline Community College’s Virtual College and eLearning Services.

Ann Garnsey-Harter has been Shoreline’s director of eLearning the past three years, coordinating online, hybrid and Web-enhanced courses.

More than 80 percent of all Shoreline students take a class that includes some online component, including the Blackboard learning management system and lecture-capture software called Tegrity.

For the past 15 years Garnsey-Harter, has focused her career on online education. She’s held positions at Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Edmonds CC, North Idaho College and Shoreline CC.

The virtual college concept was launched by Shoreline CC President Lee Lambert in fall 2010. Lambert appointed a Virtual College Leadership Team that included Garnsey-Harter as co-chair and produced a blueprint document for how the college could move forward. Since then, Garnsey-Harter has co-chaired the implementation team for the blueprint’s recommendations.

Golf tourney coming up

The Edmonds Community College Foundation’s 22nd Annual Golf Classic is scheduled for 1 p.m. Sept. 10. Last year’s tournament raised more than $56,000 for programs that benefit students, faculty and staff at the college, including contributing to 150 student scholarships.

This year’s tournament will be held at Seattle Golf Club, 210 NW 45th St., Seattle. Cost is $300 per person and includes dinner, or $1,600 for a VIP foursome including a recognition package and additional drink tickets.

Register by Aug. 20 online at www.edcc.edu/foundation or call 425-640-1512.

EdCC pens new mission statement

Edmonds Community College has a new mission statement: “Edmonds Community College strengthens our diverse community by helping students access educational and career opportunities in a supportive environment that encourages success, innovation, service, and lifelong learning.”

The new statement replaces the mission the college has had for the past 15 years. Employees across the college contributed to the adoption of the mission, which was approved by the college’s Board of Trustees at its June meeting.

“We’re not changing what we do – which is provide opportunities for students to take classes and earn degrees, certificates and diplomas – but what’s important about the new wording is that it reflects strategic and data-informed work aimed at increasing student success and retention,” Edmonds Community College President Jean Hernandez said in a press release.

As part of the new mission, the college also refined its goals to focus on diversity, creating educational and career opportunities, supporting student success and encouraging “innovation, service and lifelong learning.”

As a next step, in 2013, the college will seek community input on a five-year vision plan.

Wonderland gets new director

Wonderland Developmental Center, a Shoreline-based nonprofit that offers services to families of infants and toddlers with special needs, has named Lee Trevithick as its new executive director.

Trevithick has more than 25 years of leadership experience in human services, during which he primarily focused on youth causes. For the last 11 years he served as executive director of Cocoon House, an Everett-based youth shelter.

The father of four children, including a 9-year-old son with special needs, Trevithick called Wonderland “a special place.”

“I am extremely impressed with the quality of early intervention services Wonderland provides. I look forward to working with the board and staff so that even more children and families can benefit from this vital community resource,” he said in a press release.

The public is invited to meet Trevithick at an upcoming ice cream social to be held from 1-3 p.m. Aug. 26 at Wonderland Developmental Center, 816 NE 190th St., Shoreline.

*Correction, July 25, 2012: After this article was printed, ARTspot changed the date of the “Sky, Land &Sea” class.