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Published: Friday, March 30, 2012, 5:48 p.m.

Police agencies team up to nab speeders

  • Washington State Patrol Trooper Tim Crane processes an electronic ticket for a speeding car along I-5 in Everett on Friday morning.

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Washington State Patrol Trooper Tim Crane processes an electronic ticket for a speeding car along I-5 in Everett on Friday morning.

  • Washington State Patrol Trooper Deion Glover talks to a driver after pulling the car over for speeding along I-5 on Friday morning. Washington State P...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Washington State Patrol Trooper Deion Glover talks to a driver after pulling the car over for speeding along I-5 on Friday morning. Washington State Patrol is launching a new initiative to cut down on speeding in certain areas around the county to decrease car crashes.

  • A Washington State Patrol Trooper motions for a speeding car to pull over on I-5 in south Everett on Friday morning. This area is a target area for a ...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    A Washington State Patrol Trooper motions for a speeding car to pull over on I-5 in south Everett on Friday morning. This area is a target area for a new project launched by the Washington State Patrol that aims to cut down on speeding in certain areas to decrease car crashes.

  • Washington State Patrol Trooper Chris Houser, left, and Everett Police Officer Jeff Hendrickson, right, measure the speed of drivers on I-5 in south E...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Washington State Patrol Trooper Chris Houser, left, and Everett Police Officer Jeff Hendrickson, right, measure the speed of drivers on I-5 in south Everett looking for speeders Friday morning. This area is a target area for a new project launched by the Washington State Patrol that aims to cut down on speeding in certain areas to reduce the number of car crashes.

  • Washington State Patrol Troope Chris Houser, left, and Everett Policer Officer Jeff Hendrickson, right, measure the speed of drivers on I-5 in south E...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Washington State Patrol Troope Chris Houser, left, and Everett Policer Officer Jeff Hendrickson, right, measure the speed of drivers on I-5 in south Everett looking for speeders Friday morning. This area is a target area for a new project launched by the Washington State Patrol that aims to cut down on speeding in certain areas to reduce the number of car crashes.

  • A Washington State Patrol Trooper writes a ticket for a car that was speeding on I-5 in south Everett Friday morning. This area is a target area for a...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    A Washington State Patrol Trooper writes a ticket for a car that was speeding on I-5 in south Everett Friday morning. This area is a target area for a new project launched by the Washington State Patrol that aims to cut down on speeding in certain areas to reduce the number of car crashes.

  • Washington State Patrol Trooper Tim Crane processes an electronic ticket for a speeding car along I5 in Everett on Friday. This area is a target area ...

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Washington State Patrol Trooper Tim Crane processes an electronic ticket for a speeding car along I5 in Everett on Friday. This area is a target area for a new project launched by the Washington State Patrol that aims to cut down on speeding in certain areas to decrease car crashes.

EVERETT -- The troopers want you to see them.
In fact, that's kind of the point.
The Washington State Patrol is partnering with local police agencies to launch a new initiative to crack down on speeding in Snohomish County. If it's successful, they hope to take the program statewide.
The new targeted-patrols program officially kicks off Monday, but police started test runs this past week. The program doesn't have an official name yet.
The State Patrol analyzed data to find where and when the most speed-related wrecks occurred, especially those that ended in deaths or serious injuries.
The data highlighted three hot spots along the I-5 corridor and three in east county.
Most of the serious wrecks happened in those areas between 1 p.m. and 6 p.m., State Patrol Sgt. Kirk Rudeen said. That's the afternoon commute.
The same pattern exists on state highways, county roads and city streets, he said.
That's why traffic enforcement crews from the Snohomish County Sheriff's Office and Everett Police Department are joining in.
Drivers may see police cars and motorcycles in the targeted areas from agencies that don't normally patrol there.
Heavier traffic enforcement is planned in the afternoons in the general areas of north Everett, the intersection of I-5 and Highway 526 near Silver Lake, and I-405 between Lynnwood and Bothell.
In east county, the patrols will be east of Highway 9 in the north Lake Stevens area, the stretch of Highway 9 between Lake Stevens and Snohomish, and U.S. 2 in Monroe.
It's not about tickets, Trooper Keith Leary said.
The troopers want people to see trouble spots saturated with enforcement and people getting the message: "'You know, I better slow down,'" Leary said.
Sometimes, drivers get used to taking the same routes and get complacent about speed, Leary said. The new patrols are meant to be a serious wake-up call.
Lower speeds would mean fewer wrecks, and fewer deaths, Rudeen said. That also translates to smoother commutes and fewer backups.
Speeding is one of the top factors in traffic deaths in the state, according to Washington Traffic Safety Commission data. Impaired driving is the leading cause.
Everett police are excited to work with neighboring agencies to address speed problems in the city, Sgt. Ryan Dalberg said.
"We have a lot of concerns just because of the amount of traffic, the amount of pedestrian traffic and the sheer congestion of traffic that we're seeing," he said.
The anti-speeding program is modeled on Target Zero, a statewide effort to reduce traffic fatalities. It largely is focused on reducing impaired driving.
The new program is designed to track data over time, Leary said. Traffic patterns and driver habits change, so police need to do their homework and adjust to be effective.
Every time there's a fatal wreck, they have to ask themselves how it could have been prevented, Leary said. Speeders are considered "at-risk" drivers for serious crashes.
"We don't just come out here and treat it like a fishing pond and fill our bucket and go home every day," he said.
Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.coms





Story tags » EverettCrimePoliceI-5Traffic SafetyCar accidentTraffic

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