The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions

Nearly complete mammoth skeleton found in France

  • Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of...

    Denis Gliksman / Inrap

    Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of a mammoth.

  • Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of...

    Denis Gliksman / Inrap

    Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of a mammoth.

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Pinterest icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
Associated Press
Published:
  • Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of...

    Denis Gliksman / Inrap

    Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of a mammoth.

  • Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of...

    Denis Gliksman / Inrap

    Archaeologists work along the Changis-sur-Marne riverbank about 30 miles east of Paris in October after unearthing a rare, nearly complete skeleton of a mammoth.

PARIS -- Archaeologists in France have unearthed a rather hairy fossil -- a nearly complete skeleton of a mammoth.
The bones -- thought to belong to a creature that roamed the earth between 200,000 and 50,000 years ago -- were discovered by accident during the excavation of an ancient Roman site 30 miles east of Paris.
It may be only the third remains of a long-haired woolly mammoth discovered in France in the last 150 years. Such discoveries are more common in Siberia.
Archaeologists will try to establish the circumstances of the long-tusked specimen's death: If it drowned in the River Marne or was hunted by Neanderthal man.
It was a French scientist, Georges Cuvier, who first identified the woolly mammoth in 1796.

More Nation & World Headlines

NEWSLETTER

HeraldNet Headlines

Top stories and breaking news updates

Calendar

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus