Historic Everett building to be named for 3-term mayor

EVERETT — Everett’s longest-serving mayor is finally getting a building named after him.

Bill Moore was mayor for three terms from 1977-1990, and had sat on the City Council since 1969.

So it’s only appropriate that the building where he once worked will now officially bear his name: William E. Moore Historic City Hall.

Moore died in 1997 at age 76.

The decision to name the building after Moore had been debated for years, and in fact has been a done deal since the council approved the naming of the building after him in December.

On Saturday, Sept. 13, a dedication ceremony led by Mayor Ray Stephanson will make the name official.

“I think it’s an incredible recognition of Bill Moore and his service to the city of Everett,” Stephanson said.

Moore was a dedicated leader who prioritized building up the city’s infrastructure and was an early champion of Naval Station Everett.

“I think clearly that base would not have been here without Bill’s involvement and support vote,” Stephanson said.

The renamed building will join the list of public facilities in Everett named after former city leaders, including the Carl Gipson Senior Center, Edward D. Hansen Conference Center, Drew Nielsen Neighborhood Park, and (Bill) Langus Riverfront Park, the latter of which was expanded under Moore’s leadership.

The art deco-style Historic City Hall building at 3002 Wetmore Ave. was designed by Seattle architect A.H. Albertson and built in 1929. The building was renovated in 1978-79 during Moore’s administration, and it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

In the 1990s the city purchased the Wall Street building and moved all its administrative officers across the street. The Historic City Hall building now houses the Everett Police Department and the City Council Chambers.

But the passage to naming the building after its longtime resident wasn’t always smooth.

The nonprofit group Historic Everett came out against naming the building after Moore because a city policy prohibited renaming landmarks on historical registries.

The city later revised that code to reflect what was probably its actual intent, to protect historic buildings that already bore someone’s name, such as the Van Valey House, from being renamed for someone else.

On Sept. 13, the new plaque will be unveiled at the old City Hall building, ensuring Bill Moore’s name will be attached to his former office for years to come.

“My father would be very humbled and extremely honored to be recognized for his years of public service in the city which he dearly loved,” said Jeff Moore, Bill Moore’s youngest son who now sits on the council as council president.

Stephanson added that Moore was a warm and generous human being who was also fun to work with.

“He always had this look on his face and a sort of a chuckle, that he knew something nobody else knew. He was a delight,” Stephanson said.

Chris Winters: 425-374-4165 or cwinters@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @Chris_At_Herald.

Dedication ceremony

Mayor Ray Stephanson, City Council members and other city leaders will formally dedicate the Historic City Hall building to former mayor William E. Moore at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 13. The Everett Police Department will present the color guard ceremony and the department’s choir will perform. The building is located at 3002 Wetmore Ave.

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