Inslee fills 3 key spots on senior staff

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Thursday, January 3, 2013 3:19pm
  • Local News

Democratic Gov-elect Jay Inslee today announced the hiring of three people well-versed in the personalities and politics of Olympia to serve on his senior staff.

None will be viewed as a disruptive force for change as Inslee pledged to hire but that could change when they actually get to work Jan. 16.

First up, Ted Sturdevant. He is now the director of the Department of Ecology and will become the executive director for legislative affairs and policy for Inslee. It’s likely he will be one of the key liaisons between the new governor and the 147 men and women in the Legislature.

Next up, David Postman. He’s a former journalist who covered state government and politics for the Tacoma News Tribune and Seattle Times. After leaving the Times, he served as director of communications and media for Paul Allen’s Vulcan, Inc. For Inslee, he will be the executive director of communications. This job will likely put him in the room for strategy sessions and put him in charge of translating Inslee in a way the public and reporters can understand.

Finally, Joby Shimomura. She and Inslee go way back and she is one of his most trusted advisers. She managed Inslee’s campaign for governor and a couple of his congressional campaigns as well. When he was in Congress, she served as his chief of staff from 1999-2005. She will serve as senior advisor, a position no doubt responsible for making sure he’s in a good position to win a second term in 2016.

Finally, Inslee announced he plans to reorganize the Office of the Governor in a way that merges four divisions into two and eliminates redundant positions. Up to eight jobs may be gone when the realignment is finished, according to a press release.

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