Kira Erickson

Paul Sarkis presents a finished pizza. He and his wife Lila Sarkis recently started a take-and-bake pizza business. (Photo by David Welton)

Slice of life: Whidbey Island pizza business offers redemption

A Freeland couple is accepting orders for Feral Slice Pizza, its take-and-bake pizza biz in Clinton.

 

Kelly Cameron of Turnco Wood Goods created a bevy of giant wooden doll sculptures as part of a grant that was awarded to the Clinton Chamber of Commerce. (Photo by David Welton)

Whidbey Island comes alive with wooden sculptures

Clinton gained a few new residents recently, courtesy Kelly Cameron of Turnco Wood Goods.

 

Mackensie Bennett holds a piece that reminds some people of the Eye of Sauron, and others of an alligator. (Photo by David Welton)

Eye for glass: Whidbey artist creates ‘Gypsy Gems’

Much of what Mackensie Bennett creates is inspired by the natural world.

 

A salvage crew arrived Oct. 3, 2023, to tow the Madahy away. (Photo by David Welton)

Ghost ship ends eerie journey on Whidbey Island beach

A salvage crew was on Clinton last week to retrieve the Madahy, a derelict and abandoned vessel.

A salvage crew arrived Oct. 3, 2023, to tow the Madahy away. (Photo by David Welton)
Double Bluff Brewing Co. owners Marissa and Daniel Thomis have expanded to a new location in the old Useless Bay Coffee Co. building on Second Street in downtown Langley. (Photo by David Welton)

Whidbey Island’s Double Bluff Brewing taps into new home

After eight years on Anthes Avenue, downtown Langley’s only microbrewery is expanding.

Double Bluff Brewing Co. owners Marissa and Daniel Thomis have expanded to a new location in the old Useless Bay Coffee Co. building on Second Street in downtown Langley. (Photo by David Welton)
Made by Bruce Hutchison, the poster for “A Momentary Diversion on the Road to the Grave” is an homage to 1985 classic “The Goonies.” (Photo provided)

Indie film premiering on Whidbey Island

Filmed almost entirely on Whidbey Island, “A Momentary Diversion on the Road to the Grave” is set to premiere in Langley.

Made by Bruce Hutchison, the poster for “A Momentary Diversion on the Road to the Grave” is an homage to 1985 classic “The Goonies.” (Photo provided)
Paul and Emily Grubb are the new owners of the Little Brown Church in Maxwelton Valley. (Photo by David Welton)

Something old, something new: Whidbey church’s second life

Paul and Emily Grubb transform the historic, beloved Little Brown Church in Maxwelton Valley into a wedding venue.

Paul and Emily Grubb are the new owners of the Little Brown Church in Maxwelton Valley. (Photo by David Welton)
Allen Fletcher

DNA identifies South Whidbey Harbor remains as Port Townsend man

A missing person case in Langley that is nearly a decade old has finally, it seems, come to a close.

Allen Fletcher

South Whidbey parks and rec warns of aggressive owl

South Whidbey Parks and Recreation District released a warning on Monday about the owl.

Photo by David Welton   Derrick Sutton — also known as Eldritch Black — is the author behind the “Weirdbey Island” books. The strange, eerie series for kids is ongoing and currently has five books.

This man pens tall tales from ‘Weirdbey’ Island

Derrick Sutton (aka Eldritch Black) publishes zany books for kids. Think pirates in Penn Cove and UFOs over Ebey’s Landing.

Photo by David Welton   Derrick Sutton — also known as Eldritch Black — is the author behind the “Weirdbey Island” books. The strange, eerie series for kids is ongoing and currently has five books.
Baby Sunlight is the cutest new addition at Ballydidean Farm Sanctuary. (Photo provided)

Oink! Porcine runaways find sanctuary

Thanks to Ballydidean Farm Sanctuary in Clinton, the ham is no longer on the lam.

Baby Sunlight is the cutest new addition at Ballydidean Farm Sanctuary. (Photo provided)
Aurora Echo recently launched her new business, Wildly Beloved Foods, to sell her organic pasta, which also comes in a spinach variety. (Photo by David Welton)

Oh, the pasta-bilities: One-woman noodle factory starts up on Whidbey Island

To make her pasta, Aurora Echo uses Italian semolina flour, fresh baby spinach and whole eggs.

Aurora Echo recently launched her new business, Wildly Beloved Foods, to sell her organic pasta, which also comes in a spinach variety. (Photo by David Welton)
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Beard photo in Whidbey Island exhibit hits a snarl

A photography show has come under scrutiny due to an image of a man dressed as a female pirate.

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Kelly Cameron is the woodworker behind Clinton-based business Turnco Wood Goods. (David Welton)

Whidbey woodworkers turn local lumber into art

In the “Slab Room” at Madrona Supply Co., customers can find hunks of wood native to the south end of Whidbey Island.

Kelly Cameron is the woodworker behind Clinton-based business Turnco Wood Goods. (David Welton)
Magician JR Russell attempts to pull something out of his ear. For the past eight years, Russell has been teaching magic to kids with a side of life skills. (David Welton)

Sleight of hand: Popular classes are about more than magic

Whidbey Island magician JR Russell strives to perform the ultimate feat: Get kids off their screens

Magician JR Russell attempts to pull something out of his ear. For the past eight years, Russell has been teaching magic to kids with a side of life skills. (David Welton)
South Whidbey residents Brenda Lovie, left, and Sandi Lusk are headed to the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Finland next year. (Photo provided)

Whidbey women, age 60 and 74, to compete in Half Ironman championship

Brenda Lovie and Sandi Lusk started training for Ironman 70.3 races four years ago. They qualified for the worldwide event.

South Whidbey residents Brenda Lovie, left, and Sandi Lusk are headed to the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Finland next year. (Photo provided)
Jerry Wennstrom with “Lightning,” a multi-layered sculpture. Wennstrom’s second body of artistic work consists of several tall, wooden sculptures resembling women that are meant to represent complex themes of birth and death, good and evil, femininity and masculinity. (David Welton)

Meet a Whidbey sculptor who makes interactive, eccentric art

Jerry Wennstrom publishes a book detailing his artistic body of work, which emphasizes feminine figures.

Jerry Wennstrom with “Lightning,” a multi-layered sculpture. Wennstrom’s second body of artistic work consists of several tall, wooden sculptures resembling women that are meant to represent complex themes of birth and death, good and evil, femininity and masculinity. (David Welton)
Dan Neumeyer peers out the window of his Hummingbird Yurt. (David Welton)

Otherworldly structures constructed on Whidbey Island

The small buildings — yurts, with a Western twist — were built by Earth dweller Dan Neumeyer.

Dan Neumeyer peers out the window of his Hummingbird Yurt. (David Welton)
Tim Leonard, owner of the Machine Shop, is closing the arcade this fall. (Photo by David Welton)

Arcade owner to pull plug on beloved Whidbey Island business

Tim Leonard, owner of the Machine Shop in Langley, recently decided he’ll call it quits this fall.

Tim Leonard, owner of the Machine Shop, is closing the arcade this fall. (Photo by David Welton)
Jennifer Sadinsky is the owner of Grayhorse Mercantile, one of Langley’s newest stores. (David Welton)

Shopkeeper brings taste of Europe to Whidbey Island

A first-time business owner’s dream of opening a cheese shop became a reality this year.

Jennifer Sadinsky is the owner of Grayhorse Mercantile, one of Langley’s newest stores. (David Welton)