A Boeing 777X airplane flies over Moscow, Idaho during a test flight Tuesday. The new model of airplane had its first flight Thursday from Paine Field in Everett. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

A Boeing 777X airplane flies over Moscow, Idaho during a test flight Tuesday. The new model of airplane had its first flight Thursday from Paine Field in Everett. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

Boeing starts 777-X test flights in Moses Lake

Test operations are based in Everett and there is no plan to “overnight at Grant County International.”

By Charles H. Featherstone / Columbia Basin Herald

MOSES LAKE — The 777-X has finally arrived in Moses Lake.

The giant plane, which is the latest version of the wide body jet that first flew in 1994, will be using Grant County International Airport for a series of test flights as Boeing seeks to get the plane certified.

“We began the flight testing phase in late January 2020, and are pleased with the progress we are seeing,” said Boeing spokesperson Jessica Kowal.

Boeing is currently flying two test versions of the 777-X, while another two are being “prepared for flight,” Kowal said.

“Generally speaking, we have been to Moses Lake recently with the second airplane, for some testing and handling characteristics,” she said.

While Boeing has long owned a facility in Moses Lake, and currently parks over 250 737 Max aircraft at GCIA following their grounding, Kowal said the company’s test operations are based in Everett and the company does not plan to “overnight at Grant County International.”

According to officials with the Port of Moses Lake, Boeing was waiting for the completion of repairs on the GCIA main runway to start test flights here.

Billed by Boeing as “the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world,” the 777-X has been outfitted with carbon-fiber composite wings and new engines that the company says will reduce fuel use by 10 percent on long-haul flights.

According to Kowal, the company has 340 orders and commitments to buy the roughly $425 million plane, which is expected to enter service in 2021.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

She teaches the traditional language of Coast Salish tribes

Natosha Gobin is spreading her passion for Lushootseed to tribal and non-tribal students.

‘I want to live and raise a family where everyone has a home’

Alexander Lark once built nest boxes for ducks. Now he raises money for Housing Hope and its families.

She knows the transformative power of education

Ambar Martinez also knows first hand the challenge of acclimation for people of diverse backgrounds.

He helps veterans achieve their educational and career goals

Chester Curtis helped raise money to open a center that serves veterans and their families.

He wants to ‘leave my community better than I found it’

WSU Everett spokesman Randy Bolerjack has a message for all students: Help your community thrive.

She’s making sure young people don’t feel lost or left out

Through her tireless efforts, Nicole Amor connects people with needed programs and services.

A ‘mother interested in helping kids’ hopes to end stereotypes

Edmonds activist and consultant Courtney Wooten advocates for children throughout Snohomish County.

She’s listening to and learning from diverse communities

Christine Stansfield is helping a south Everett neighborhood take charge of its library.

In Everett, he’s found a home base for countywide involvement

Julio Cortes made a difference at Cocoon House and now works to promote the city and the region.

Most Read