Amanda Strong, left, tries on an Angel of the Winds Arena hat as she and Courtney Brown hand out gift bags after the arena renaming ceremony on Dec. 13, 2017 in Everett. Casino managers hinted something else was on the horizon. A month later, they announced a major addition and expansion to the casino north of Arlington. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Amanda Strong, left, tries on an Angel of the Winds Arena hat as she and Courtney Brown hand out gift bags after the arena renaming ceremony on Dec. 13, 2017 in Everett. Casino managers hinted something else was on the horizon. A month later, they announced a major addition and expansion to the casino north of Arlington. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Angel of the Winds to break ground on $60M casino expansion

“We think we’re on the cusp of becoming a major resort.”

ARLINGTON — Angel of the Winds Casino is planning a more than $60 million expansion, the largest addition in the history of the property.

The 300,000-square-foot expansion will focus on adding more amenities such as a high-end restaurant and a new buffet as well as more table games and slots to the casino north of Arlington.

“We think it’s going to be a game changer for our property,” said Jeff Wheatley, Angel of the Winds assistant general manager. “We think we’re on the cusp of becoming a major resort.”

The expansion will allow the casino to add 300 to 400 slot machines and 10 to 15 table games with space to add even more to meet future demand. The casino currently has 1,225 slot machines and 20 table games. The expansion also is expected to include a 400-space parking garage.

The Stillaguamish Tribe, which owns the casino, plans to hold a groundbreaking ceremony next week to celebrate the expansion.

As many as 450 people, including the tribal council, casino executives, civic and community leaders and business partners, are expected at the event.

The casino has been planning the expansion for the past two to two and a half years, Wheatley said.

The project was hinted at in mid-December when Angel of the Winds became the title sponsor for the downtown Everett arena.

The casino paid $3.4 million for the former Xfinity Arena to be called Angel of the Winds Arena.

Angel of the Winds general manager Travis O’Neil said there would be other announcements on the horizon.

“We are looking at plans to expand some amenities at the casino itself, but we’re not ready to divulge the details,” O’Neil said at the time.

On Tuesday morning, the casino sent out a news release with the announcement of the expansion and the groundbreaking ceremony.

This is the first expansion at the casino since the tribe opened a $27 million, five-story attached hotel in December 2014.

The Tulalip Tribes are also making an upgrade.

The tribes started construction last month on a $140 million casino and hotel to replace Quil Ceda Creek Casino at 6410 33rd Ave. NE, Tulalip. The new casino is being built across the street from the old one on 16 acres. Quil Ceda Creek is the smaller of their two casinos.

Demand has been increasing at Angel of the Winds Casino over the past few years, Wheatley said. Customers have also told staff they love to come to the casino to gamble, but wanted more things to do there.

“There’s a lot of competition in the market,” Wheatley said. “I think we’re all driving ourselves to get better and serve the local community.”

Jim Davis: 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; @HBJnews.

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