Investigative Journalism Fund

Support local reporting essential to a vibrant community and
a healthy democracy with your tax-deductible contribution

Woman in Quakes

(Olivia Vanni / The Herald )

Serving as the community watchdog is a core responsibility of the press – and it is an expensive undertaking.

Investigative reporters and editors can spend months on a single story to surface the information that citizens in a democracy deserve to know. Such reporting holds those in power accountable and can provoke reform that benefits a community.

To support investigative reporting that is essential for a vibrant community, The Daily Herald established the Investigative Journalism Fund in March 2020. Since then, community contributions to the fund helped The Daily Herald add an investigative reporter and editor to our staff – but we need ongoing support to bring you impactful stories about the issues that matter most to you.

Help us raise $750,000 for this labor-intensive and time-consuming reporting that benefits our community.

The Daily Herald maintains editorial control over content produced with fund resources.

Donate

Need help donating or have questions?

Contact Brenda Mann Harrison, journalism development director brenda.harrison@heraldnet.com.

Our partner

Journalism Funding Partners, a 501(c)(3) organization, serves as the fiscal sponsor for The Daily Herald Investigative Journalism Fund. The mission of Journalism Funding Partners is to increase the depth, diversity and sustainability of local journalism by building and stewarding connections between funders and news organizations.

The Investigative Journalism Fund accepts tax-deductible contributions from individuals, nonprofits, corporations, local businesses, philanthropic foundations, and others who believe investigative reporting supports a vibrant community and a healthy democracy.

Get more details about the Investigative Journalism Fund in answers to frequently asked questions.

Capitol Riot Picture

(From video taken Jan. 6, 2021)

Our community impact

Investigations published in The Daily Herald have:

  • Been used by the United States Attorney General to charge a Snohomish County member of the violent hate group the Proud Boys for his front-line role in a mob of rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on January 6.
  • Shined a light on a Snohomish County Sheriff deputy who was found “NOT credible” but still has a badge.
  • Exposed the forced resignation of a long-time member of the Everett city’s fire inspectors and a culture of doing less.