Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen at their home on Sept. 5 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen at their home on Sept. 5 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Historic houses on Everett tour standing the test of time

The Historic Everett Home Tour is Sept. 8 and features six homes built between 1909 and 1924.

It’s not too late to get tickets for Historic Everett’s home tour.

It starts at 10 a.m. today . Tickets and maps to the six homes on the tour are available at the Van Valey House, 2130 Colby Ave., Everett.

Homes on this year’s self-guided tour were built between 1909 and 1924, with styles ranging from American Craftsman to Colonial Revival.

Among them is the home owned by Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen. The residence was built in 1923 and was later owned by Arthur Gunderson, one of the four founding physicians of The Everett Clinic. The Gunderson family lived in the home from 1934 to 1988.

Egberding and her husband have called it home for 21 years. “I had always said if I ever could, we wanted to live on the bluff,” she said.

While on a bike ride in 1996, the couple spotted the home, which on that day was the site of a large garage sale.

“We commented on the view,” Egberding said. The owner gave the couple a tour and told them it was going on the market the next day.

A large yard with a two-level deck at Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen’s home Sept. 5 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

A large yard with a two-level deck at Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen’s home Sept. 5 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

They came to a purchase agreement with the seller in January 1997 and moved in the next month.

They previously lived in a 1913 one-story bungalow on Rucker Avenue. They added a second story and remodeled it in the style of the original home. Their work was awarded a Brown Award from the Everett Historical Commission, which recognizes outstanding examples of historic preservation.

Their current home includes molded plaster cornices in the living room and beveled glass bookcases in the sun room.

“I love the whole history of the house,” Egberding said. “Ritch and I feel like caretakers of the house — ready for the next person to come along.”

A Batchelder tile fireplace is the centerpiece of the living room at Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen’s home Sept. 5, 2018 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

A Batchelder tile fireplace is the centerpiece of the living room at Marlies Egberding and Ritch Sorgen’s home Sept. 5, 2018 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

The oldest home on the 2018 tour was built in 1909.

The house caught the eye of Patrice Doerr when she and a friend took their kids to local parks to play. They would ooh and ahh as they passed the city’s historic homes. Although the bungalow especially intrigued her, she didn’t give it much thought. But her friend kept hinting, even imploring, that she really should think about buying the place.

“I never thought I would leave my house in Seattle,” Doerr said.

Nevertheless, she made the move just over a year ago, celebrating the one-year anniversary on July 1.

“This neighborhood really suits me,” she said. “Here it’s very relaxing. Neighbors are so friendly. I just love it.”

To longtime Everett residents, the home is known as the one formerly owned by Bob and Margaret Bavasi. The couple owned the Everett Giants, the minor league team that later became the Everett AquaSox, part of the Mariners’ farm system.

David Chrisman, president of Historic Everett, said the Bavasi house may be his sentimental favorite on this year’s tour.

The brick used around the home’s front porch is known as clinker brick. The misshapen bricks were once thought of as factory defects. Builders began using them because of their unusual style.

“Usually having a clinker brick entrance is as warm and welcoming as you can get in Everett,” he said.

Chrisman said he hopes the tour inspires people to preserve and restore older homes.

It also helps bring attention to the quality of life in Everett and what makes it special, he said.

“We don’t want to lose those characteristics,” Chrisman said. “That’s why we showcase these as outstanding examples of our residential history.”

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

If you go

What: Historic Everett Home Tour

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 8

Tickets: $20, cash or check, at J Matheson Gifts, 2615 Colby Ave., or Van Valey House, 2130 Colby Ave.

More: 425-293-2767 or www.HistoricEverett.org

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