Anthony Brock performs at Artisans PNW during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Anthony Brock performs at Artisans PNW during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

At downtown Everett musical festival: ‘Be weird and dance with us’

In its first night, Fisherman’s Village brought together people who “might not normally be in the same room together” — with big acts still to come.

EVERETT — On the Lucky Dime stage Thursday night, Max Green felt at home.

“Can I get another Rainier? Put it on my tab, we’re a little busy at the moment,” said the bassist with local garage-psychedelic band Dead Energy between songs.

“Twisted Tea, original flavor,” added his brother Jerry Green, the lead vocalist and guitarist.

Dead Energy performed on the first night of the 11th annual Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, put on by the Everett Music Initiative.

Dead Energy performs at Lucky Dime during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Dead Energy performs at Lucky Dime during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

The three-day festival continues Friday and Saturday at Lucky Dime, 1618 Hewitt Ave.; Black Lab Gallery, 1805 Hewitt Ave.; and Kings Hall, at 1611 Everett Ave, a major new venue that opened around the same time as last year’s festival.

The last two days will also feature free music at the Night Market stage in the parking lot of 2930 Wetmore Ave.

From the Southern rock of Drive-By Truckers to Seattle hip-hop artist Sol to R&B singer Allen Stone, the festival is known for showcasing an eclectic mix of talent.

“Diversity has always been important to the team and the festival,” festival founder Ryan Crowther said.

Thursday night began with musician Anthony Brock performing folk and pop tunes at Artisans PNW, where secondhand books and local paintings line the walls. The crowd danced and sang along while Brock sang about his mother.

An hour later at Lucky Dime, the five members of Dead Energy played twin electric guitar riffs a block up the street.

The band, featuring members from Snohomish and Everett, has played at Lucky Dime about 20 times.

“This next song is called ‘Hockey,’” Jerry Green said. “We want the Silvertips to play it (when they score a goal).”

“They’re the best hockey team on the West Coast,” he added — knowing his audience.

The crowd cheered in response.

Jerry Green had one last message for the audience at the end of the set.

“Remember our name, Dead Energy,” Green yelled. “Say it with me. ‘Americans. Not those German phonies,’” referring to a German cover band with the same name.

Dead Energy, already with an EP and two singles, hope for a full-length album in 2025.

The band has an upcoming show at the Vera Project in Seattle and a tour this summer along the West Coast.

People watch as Dead Energy performs at Lucky Dime during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

People watch as Dead Energy performs at Lucky Dime during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

An hour later, Soft Release, a post-funk experimental duo featuring Carolyn Brotherton and Andy Sells, energized the Lucky Dime crowd. The two members met at the downtown Everett venue in December 2022 while playing on their solo projects: Mt Fog and Select Level.

Sells joined Brotherton in Mt Fog. They eventually started Soft Release as a passion project.

They wrote their first song in a day.

“If anything, it was too easy,” Sells said.

On Thursday night, Soft Release featured Brotherton’s hypnotic vocals and Sells on the bass.

“We have two more songs,” Brotherton said toward the end.

“Man! Only two?” screamed an audience member.

When Brotherton announced the last song, “Broken Number 13,” she had some advice for the crowd.

“It’s a dance song, so you’re welcome to be weird and dance with us,” Brotherton said.

Brotherton says “weird” a lot during her shows.

For her, “being weird, present and together” is part of being a human, not a robot.

So it was natural and “weird” for her to leave the stage to pace, dance, sing and scream with the audience during their set.

Sells and Brotherton talked about how much they appreciate the variety of Fisherman’s Village, as they waited for the next act, Jang the Goon, a Spokane hip-hop artist.

“You get a whole mix of things, because there’s not as much emphasis on homogeneity,” Sells said.

“Yeah,” Brotherton said. “It’s about building community in Everett, and bringing people who might not normally be in the same room together.”

Jordan Campbell performs at Zamarama Gallery during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Jordan Campbell performs at Zamarama Gallery during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Remaining schedule for Fisherman’s Village Music Festival

Friday

The Night Market opens 5 p.m. Friday, with no ticket is required.

Night Market Stage

4 p.m. The Music Circle: Kids Band

5:30 p.m. Tim Turner Band

7 p.m. Massy Fergusson

8:30 p.m. Poker Face Lady Gaga Tribute

Lucky Dime

6 p.m. Tomo Nakayama

7:30 p.m. Telehealth

12:30 a.m. Foxy Apollo

Blacklab

6:45 p.m. The Maya Experience

8 p.m. Jenn Champion

12:15 a.m. Emily Wolfe

Kings Hall

8:30 p.m. Sol

9:45 p.m. Courtney Marie Andrews

11 p.m. Allen Stone

Saturday

Night Market Stage

1 p.m. Drag Brunch

3:30 p.m. School of Rock

5 p.m. Nikki & The Fast Times

6:45 p.m. ’90s Rewind

8:30 p.m. Cloud Cover

Lucky Dime

5 p.m. Floral Hall

6 p.m. Screen Frogs

7:15 p.m. The Macks

8:30 p.m. Eric Slick (Dr. Dog)

Black Lab

5:30 p.m. Smith & Tegio

6:45 p.m. Molly Parden

8 p.m. Kimmi Bitter

12:15 a.m. Wine Lips

Kings Hall

8:30 p.m. Jenny Don’t and the Spurs

9:45 p.m. Shovels & Rope

11 p.m. Drive-By Truckers

Aina de Lapparent Alvarez: 425-339-3449; aina.alvarez@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @Ainadla.

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