The B & W was the first Boeing product, named after the initials of its designers, William Boeing and Navy Lt. Conrad Westervelt. The first B & W, completed in June 1916, was made of wood, linen and wire. Similar to the Martin trainer that Boeing owned, the B & W had, among other improvements, better pontoons and a more powerful engine. The two B & Ws were offered to the U.S. Navy. When the Navy did not buy them, they were sold to the New Zealand Flying School and became the company’s first international sale. The B & Ws later were used for New Zealand express and airmail deliveries, set a New Zealand altitude record of 6,500 feet on June 25, 1919, and made that country’s first official airmail flight on Dec. 16, 1919.

The B & W was the first Boeing product, named after the initials of its designers, William Boeing and Navy Lt. Conrad Westervelt. The first B & W, completed in June 1916, was made of wood, linen and wire. Similar to the Martin trainer that Boeing owned, the B & W had, among other improvements, better pontoons and a more powerful engine. The two B & Ws were offered to the U.S. Navy. When the Navy did not buy them, they were sold to the New Zealand Flying School and became the company’s first international sale. The B & Ws later were used for New Zealand express and airmail deliveries, set a New Zealand altitude record of 6,500 feet on June 25, 1919, and made that country’s first official airmail flight on Dec. 16, 1919.

Daily Herald special report: Boeing’s 100 years

The Boeing Co. is turning 100 on July 15. Throughout the year, The Daily Herald is covering the people, airplanes and moments that define The Boeing Century. Some of these stories are from a special print report distributed on July 8, 2016.

Friday, July 8

Seven big moments that shaped the future of Boeing

Aerospace-industry mavens discuss Boeing’s next 100 years

Saturday, July 9

From roots in Seattle, Boeing has spread to far-flung sites

Mergers and buys expanded Boeing’s business beyond planes

Sunday, July 10

Scrappy at first, Boeing grew into a company built to last

To the moon: Boeing’s expertise boosted U.S. into space

Monday, July 11

In the early years, warplanes kept Boeing cruising

A car, a space plane … Boeing ideas that didn’t pan out

Tuesday, July 12

For Boeing families, company history is theirs, too

Boeing workers were ‘part of something remarkable’

Wednesday, July 13

Design firm pioneers virtual-reality tours of Boeing jets

Jetmakers eager to break Boeing’s grip on commercial market

Thursday, July 14

Boeing’s influence is felt in Washington and beyond

Data suggest aerospace tax breaks help attract suppliers

Local relationships with Boeing: many ups and downs

Friday, July 15

Boeing’s first 100 years: A timeline

Oso was site of Boeing’s only commercial-jet crash in state

Saturday, July 16

How Boeing’s labor relations have evolved

Renton has shared in Boeing’s highs and lows

Sunday, July 17

Wild ideas today may be Boeing aircraft tomorrow


A MESSAGE FROM SOUND PUBLISHING INC.

By Gloria Fletcher

President and CEO

Happy anniversary and congratulations to the Boeing Co.! Sound Publishing Inc., with its 49 community newspapers and websites, joins with many Washington state businesses to recognize and celebrate the Boeing Co.’s 100th anniversary.

It is impossible to contemplate Boeing without thinking about the company’s Pacific Northwest roots. Founder Bill Boeing, who was drawn to Washington state’s timber industry, rode in his first airplane in 1915 over Lake Washington and had an early float-plane hangar on Seattle’s Lake Union.

It is equally impossible to look around the Puget Sound region without seeing the many ways Boeing has fueled and shaped the places we call home. Today, more than 130,000 highly skilled workers are employed by 1,300 aerospace-related firms throughout the state, producing some of the world’s best-known and well-respected products and services.

As the company and the region have grown together, Boeing’s impact has stretched far beyond the economic and employment statistics. The company made its first donation to the University of Washington in 1917, helping start an aeronautical engineering program, and throughout its existence, has been a generous source of gifts and investments in our region’s educational, cultural and charitable institutions.

During its first 100 years, the Boeing Co. encountered its share of bumpy air. Fluctuations in the national economy, competition in the aeronautics industry, and inconstant political and military policies all challenged the company’s resilience. It certainly hasn’t always been easy for the behemoth company, yet Boeing has seemingly met each challenge with as much knowledge, experience and grace as possible.

Looking toward its next century, the company continues to trust its future to innovation. This has always been the Boeing way, from the first factory in a Duwamish River shipyard to the recently opened composite-wing assembly center in Everett. The ripple effect of Boeing innovation has brought hundreds of high-tech air-and-space companies to the Pacific Northwest.

Businesses and institutions in Washington state have been fortunate to have the Boeing Co. as a community partner. Sound Publishing knows the cities and communities it serves are strong, smart and prosperous places thanks to the contributions Boeing has made for 100 years.

For that, we say thank you!

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Local News

A view of one of the potential locations of the new Aquasox stadium on Monday, Feb. 26, 2024 in Everett, Washington. The site sits between Hewitt Avenue, Broadway, Pacific Avenue and the railroad. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
20 businesses could be demolished for downtown Everett stadium

Some business owners say the city didn’t tell them of plans for a new AquaSox stadium that could displace their businesses.

Kathy Purviance-Snow poses for a photo in her computer lab at Snohomish High School on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2024, in Snohomish, WA. (Annie Barker / The Herald)
To ban or embrace ChatGPT? Local teachers fight AI with AI — or don’t

“It has fundamentally changed my teaching in really stressful and exciting ways,” an EvCC teacher said. At all levels of education, ChatGPT poses a tricky question.

In this Feb. 5, 2018, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 7 is displayed during a debut for employees and media of the new jet in Renton, Wash. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
FAA gives Boeing 90 days to develop plan to fix quality, safety issues

The agency’s ultimatum comes a day after a meeting with CEO Dave Calhoun and other top Boeing officials in Washington, D.C.

A man walks by Pfizer headquarters, Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, in New York. Pfizer will spend about $43 billion to buy Seagen and broaden its reach into cancer treatments, the pharmaceutical giant said. (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan, File)
Pfizer backs out of Everett manufacturing plant after $43B Seagen deal

Pfizer finalized the acquisition of the Bothell-based cancer drug developer in December.

Cars drive through snow along I-5 in Snohomish County, Washington on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024.  (Annie Barker / The Herald)
In March, 7 p.m. sunsets are back for Western Washington

Washingtonians will finally start seeing more sun starting March 10. But a little more winter could be on the way first.

One of the parking lots at Stevens Pass Thursday afternoon on December 30, 2021.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Stevens Pass to charge $20 for parking reservations on busy days

Two-thirds of spaces will remain free for early arrivers on weekends. Cars with four or more occupants can also park free.

Lynnwood
Days after shootout with Lynnwood police, suspect checks into hospital

Police learned the 18-year-old was in a hospital in Portland, Oregon. His alleged role in the shooting remained unclear.

Everett
Snohomish County pharmacy tech accused of stealing 2,500 opioid pills

Rachel Langdon stole oxycodone while working at a Snohomish County pharmacy, according to state Department of Health allegations.

Patrick Kunz speaks during his sentencing on Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, at Snohomish County Superior Court in Everett, Washington.(Annie Barker / The Herald)
Everett gymnastics coach who spied on students sentenced to 6 months

Patrick Kunz, 47, pleaded guilty to charges of voyuerism and possession of child pornography last month.

Traffic moves along Highway 526 in front of Boeing’s Everett Production Facility on Nov. 28, 2022, in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / Sound Publishing)
Everett transgender mechanic alleges Boeing treated her ‘like a zoo animal’

For years, Boeing allowed toxicity “to fester and grow” at its Everett factory, according to Rachel Rasmussen, an employee from 1989 to 2024.

Everett police officers survey the scene of a shooting along East Casino Road on Friday, Oct. 13, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Washington’s 5th police academy could be in Snohomish County

A new academy in Northwest Washington would help clear a lengthy wait list for new police hires to get training.

Monroe High School (Monroe School District)
Monroe High School teacher accused of sexual misconduct, put on leave

Few details were not available Thursday afternoon. Police were seeking information from the public.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.