Harris-Moore could be headed to Idaho

McMINNVILLE, Ore. — Graham Goad became suspicious when hot dogs began to disappear from his office at the McMinnville Municipal Airport.

Goad, the airport manager, twice opened his refrigerator to discover missing food.

There was more that was out of place. His computer had been reset and the Internet connection unplugged.

When he learned that an Enterprise rental car was stolen from the small airport, he thought about Colton Harris-Moore, the notorious teenage fugitive from Camano Island.

Now, it looks like Harris-Moore could have completed a tour of Oregon and be headed into Idaho, Goad said.

Police in McMinnville, in western Oregon, and in Ontario, in eastern Oregon, are investigating vehicle thefts and airplane hangar burglaries. Other police departments have previously linked those type of crimes to Harris-Moore.

A Cadillac Escalade was stolen on June 9 from McMinnville and recovered the following day at the airport in Ontario, a small border town northwest of Boise, Idaho.

An airport hangar there was broken into and a pilot’s truck was stolen. Police found that stolen truck between Ontario and Boise.

It also appears that a hangar was burglarized in McMinnville, where Goad works.

If Harris-Moore is in Idaho, it won’t be the first time the 19-year-old serial burglar has been sought by law enforcement in that state. He’s suspected of stealing a plane from a small airport in the northern Idaho panhandle in October and later crashing it near Granite Falls.

The teen’s trail of suspected crimes — including stolen planes, cars and boats — now stretches through three states and British Columbia. He’s been a fugitive since April 2008 and is being sought by the FBI and local law enforcement.

In late May, along a route that appears to extend from the Kitsap Peninsula south to the southwestern corner of the state, the 6-foot, 5-inch teen stopped to leave a message.

A handwritten note signed by the teenager was left at a veterinary clinic on May 30 or 31 and police have confirmed its authenticity, according to The Herald’s news partner KIRO-TV.

The note left at a Raymond, Wash., clinic reads: “Drove by, had some extra cash. Please use this cash for the care of animals — Colton Harris-Moore, (AKA: “The Barefoot Bandit”) Camano Island, WA.”

Police confirmed to the CBS news program “48 Hours” that fingerprints taken from the note match Harris-Moore.

A police operator in Raymond authenticated the story Thursday and said the note was a low priority for police since there was no evidence of a crime in that community.

Harris-Moore reportedly has a love of animals. He’s been called the “Barefoot Bandit” by some media outlets after reports that he sometimes flees crime scenes shoeless. Officials said he most often wears shoes.

Police in Warrenton, Ore., just across the Columbia River, said Harris-Moore may be responsible for a string of crimes there on June 1. They are investigating a boat theft, an attempted airplane theft and a car theft — all crimes similar to those linked to the teenager.

The car stolen from Warrenton was ditched in the rural town of Dayton, a few miles from McMinnville.

The San Juan County Sheriff’s Office last pinned Harris-Moore’s location to Lopez Island.

Surveillance video on May 15 captured the image of a person police believe to be Harris-Moore just before a boat was stolen from a marina at the island’s north end. That boat was found adrift off the southern tip of Camano Island the next day.

Another boat was taken, this time from the south end of Whidbey Island a few days later. It was found aground near Kingston on the Kitsap Peninsula. Speculation swirled that Harris-Moore was responsible.

While investigators still are collecting evidence, at least this much appears to be clear about the elusive teen.

“He’s hungry and likes to travel,” Goad said.

Reporter Jackson Holtz: 425-339-3437, jholtz@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Local News

Snohomish residents Barbara Bailey, right, and Beth Jarvis sit on a gate atop a levee on Bailey’s property on Monday, May 13, 2024, at Bailey Farm in Snohomish, Washington. Bailey is concerned the expansion of nearby Harvey Field Airport will lead to levee failures during future flood events due to a reduction of space for floodwater to safely go. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Harvey Field seeks to reroute runway in floodplain, faces new pushback

Snohomish farmers and neighbors worry the project will be disruptive and worsen flooding. Ownership advised people to “read the science.”

IAM District 751 machinists join the picket line to support Boeing firefighters during their lockout from the company on Thursday, May 16, 2024, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Amid lockout, Boeing, union firefighters return to bargaining table

The firefighters and the planemaker held limited negotiations this week: They plan to meet again Monday, but a lockout continues.

Heavy traffic northbound on 1-5 in Everett, Washington on August 31, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
On I-5 in Everett, traffic nightmare is reminder we’re ‘very vulnerable’

After a police shooting shut down the freeway, commutes turned into all-night affairs. It was just a hint of what could be in a widespread disaster.

Anthony Brock performs at Artisans PNW during the first day of the Fisherman’s Village Music Fest on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
At downtown Everett musical festival: ‘Be weird and dance with us’

In its first night, Fisherman’s Village brought together people who “might not normally be in the same room together” — with big acts still to come.

Two troopers place a photo of slain Washington State Patrol trooper Chris Gadd outside District 7 Headquarters about twelve hours after Gadd was struck and killed on southbound I-5 about a mile from the headquarters on Saturday, March 2, 2024, in Marysville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Judge reduces bail for driver accused of killing Marysville trooper

After hearing from Raul Benitez Santana’s family, a judge decreased bail to $100,000. A deputy prosecutor said he was “very disappointed.”

Pet detective Jim Branson stops to poke through some fur that Raphael the dog found while searching on Saturday, March 2, 2024, in Everett, Washington. Branson determined the fur in question was likely from a rabbit, and not a missing cat.(Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Lost a pet? Pet detective James Branson and his dogs may be able to help

James Branson, founder of Three Retrievers Lost Pet Rescue, helps people in the Seattle area find their missing pets for $350.

Community Transit leaders, from left, Chief Communications Officer Geoff Patrick, Zero-Emissions Program Manager Jay Heim, PIO Monica Spain, Director of Maintenance Mike Swehla and CEO Ric Ilgenfritz stand in front of Community Transit’s hydrogen-powered bus on Monday, May 13, 2024, at the Community Transit Operations Base in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
New hydrogen, electric buses get trial run in Snohomish County

As part of a zero-emission pilot program from Community Transit, the hydrogen bus will be the first in the Puget Sound area.

Two people fight on the side of I-5 neat Marysville. (Photo provided by WSDOT)
Video: Man charged at trooper, shouting ‘Who’s the boss?’ before shooting

The deadly shooting shut down northbound I-5 near Everett for hours. Neither the trooper nor the deceased had been identified as of Friday.

Two people fight on the side of I-5 neat Marysville. (Photo provided by WSDOT)
Road rage, fatal police shooting along I-5 blocks traffic near Everett

An attack on road workers preceded a report of shots fired Thursday, snarling freeway traffic in the region for hours.

The Port of Everett and Everett Marina on Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Is Port of Everett’s proposed expansion a ‘stealth tax?’ Judge says no

A Snohomish resident lost a battle in court this week protesting what he believes is a misleading measure from the Port of Everett.

Pablo Garduno and the team at Barbacoa Judith’s churn out pit-roasted lamb tacos by the dozen at the Hidden Gems Weekend Market on Sunday, April 28, 2024, at Boom City in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Eating our way through Tulalip’s Hidden Gems weekend market

Don’t miss the pupusas, pit-roasted lamb tacos, elotes and even produce for your next meal.

Reed Macdonald, magniX CEO. Photo: magniX
Everett-based magniX appoints longtime aerospace exec as new CEO

Reed Macdonald will take the helm at a pivotal time for the company that builds electric motors for airplanes.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.