Island of lost bags

Associated Press

SCOTTSBORO, Ala. — Luggage is never really lost, it’s just misplaced.

So where is it? There’s a good chance it’s on a store shelf in northern Alabama, where the country’s largest lost-baggage retailer sells everything from diamond-studded cuff links and pearls to boxer shorts and half-used cans of shaving cream.

The Unclaimed Baggage Center, which covers an entire city block, has an agreement with a number of U.S airlines to resell unclaimed luggage and its contents for half the original value.

Need a 41-carat emerald? Owner Bryan Owens will sell it to you for just $29,500 — half the appraised value, he says. A Ralph Lauren cashmere sports coat? $100. A red and yellow boogie board? A bargain at $8. How about a Palm Pilot for $125?

"I come here pretty much every week," said Sherrie Rhoades of Huntsville, about 40 miles from Scottsboro. "Today I needed a nice hat for a funeral this weekend, and I found two."

Clothing is cleaned and pressed before it is sold, said Owens, who adds thousands of items to his shelves daily. The supply comes not only from unclaimed passenger bags, but unclaimed air freight and items left at airports or on airplanes.

"It’s a little bit like Christmas everyday — we get these bags that come in and we never know what we’ll find," said Owens, who sports a gold Cartier watch reclaimed from a lost suitcase.

Rare finds, such as a leather Stetson hat signed "To Brent from Muhammad Ali 9/2/88," are part of the company’s tiny museum, which includes a 1770 violin and a puppet from a Jim Henson movie.

The store was founded 30 years ago by Owens’ father, Doyle, in Scottsboro, a small manufacturing city near the Tennessee border.

As the story goes, Owens borrowed a pickup truck and $300 to buy lost luggage from the Greyhound bus company and then dumped the mishmash of button-down shirts and electric razors on a fold-out table.

The business has since grown to a 50,000-square-foot store with more than 110 workers and a cafe selling Starbucks coffee. Customers can shop six days a week or browse for merchandise at any time on the store’s Internet site: www.unclaimedbaggage.com.

Owens has a written agreement with airlines to not disclose from whom he buys merchandise or for how much. He can’t even say how much money he makes annually.

However, he does say he has no competition.

Luggage is typically lost because its identification tag gets ripped off and there is nothing inside the bag to link it to a passenger. Sometimes the unmarked luggage goes to the wrong airport, compounding the problem.

It is impossible to determine exactly how many pieces of luggage go missing, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. But during a nine-month period in 1999, 2 million travelers who flew on the 10 largest airlines reported lost or mishandled bags. Of those, 98 percent were eventually returned to their owners.

Still, that 2 percent has made a nice business for the Owens family. More than 800,000 customers come through the doors of Unclaimed Baggage annually, he said.

The company doesn’t promote itself, relying instead on word-of-mouth and free listings in tourists’ guides to attract customers.

Shoppers browsing through racks of clothing, which makes up 60 percent of the store’s merchandise, expressed no guilt in taking advantage of travelers’ misfortune.

"I truly don’t care. I know they’re being reimbursed," said Judy Rodgers of Scottsboro. "It’s like looking for treasure. You never know what you’ll find."

Copyright ©2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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