Work on damaged Index-Galena route could begin in 2019

Most of the work is done, but a half a mile of the roadway is still under water.

INDEX — Work to repair a key route into the east Snohomish County wilderness could begin as soon as next year, more than a decade after the roadway was washed out in a flood.

Index-Galena Road could reopen in 2021, if all goes according to plan. Snohomish County officials last week said they’d secured the federal grants they need to move ahead.

“We are grateful that our congressional delegation supported this project, acknowledging its importance to the residents, businesses and recreational users from across the region,” County Executive Dave Somers said in a press release. “This funding will help restore access to thousands of acres of Wild Sky Wilderness and finally restore this important regional roadway.”

Election-day flooding in 2006 caused heavy damage along the road. Most sections have since been repaired, but not the stretch between mile post 6.4 and 6.9. Much of it remains underwater in the North Fork Skykomish River.

While half a mile of roadway is damaged, the rebuild involves a mile-long span, public works deputy director Doug McCormick said.

Engineers plan to move the road up the hillside, and farther away from the river, to better withstand flooding, project manager Larry Brewer said. It’s also being engineered to handle an area prone to rock slides.

When finished, the repaired road will connect a 14-mile corridor serving homes and campgrounds in the area. It will make it easier to reach parts of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, including the Wild Sky Wilderness.

“It’s going to restore a lot of year-round access to a lot of (U.S.) Forest Service land,” Brewer said.

The construction timeline spans three seasons in part because snow and rain limit the times when crews can work in the area. Salmon protections also restrict work near the water for much of the year.

The total budget for the project is $26.5 million, down slightly from earlier estimates.

The largest piece of funding is coming from the Federal Highway Administration. Other sources include county money, the Washington State County Road Administration Board and the Federal Land Access Program.

Noah Haglund: 425-339-3465; nhaglund@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @NWhaglund.

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Local News

People look out onto Mountain Loop Mine from the second floor hallway of Fairmount Elementary on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Mining company ordered to stop work next to school south of Everett

After operating months without the right paperwork, OMA Construction applied for permits last week. The county found it still violates code.

Snohomish County Jail. (Sue Misao / Herald file)
Arlington woman arrested in 2005 case of killed baby in Arizona airport

Annie Sue Anderson, 51, has been held in the Snohomish County Jail since December. She’s facing extradition.

A Cessna 150 crashed north of Paine Field on Friday evening, Feb. 16, 2024, in Mukilteo, Washington. The pilot survived without serious injury. (Courtesy of Richard Newman.)
‘I’m stuck in the trees’: 911 call recounts plane crash near Paine Field

Asad Ali was coming in for a landing in a Cessna 150 when he crashed into woods south of Mukilteo. Then he called 911 — for 48 minutes.

Everett
Snohomish County likely to feel more like winter, beginning Monday

Get ready for a mix of rain and snow this week, along with cooler temperatures.

The Nimbus Apartments are pictured on Wednesday, March 1, 2023, in downtown Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Snohomish County has the highest rent in the state. Could this bill help?

In one year, rent for the average two-bedroom apartment in Snohomish County went up 20%. A bill seeks to cap any increases at 7%.

A Snohomish County no trespassing sign hangs on a fence surrounding the Days Inn on Monday, Feb. 12, 2024 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Meth cleanup at Edmonds motel-shelter made matters worse, report says

Contamination has persisted at two motels Snohomish County bought to turn into shelters in 2022. In January, the county cut ties with two cleanup agencies.

A child gets some assistance dancing during Narrow Tarot’s set on the opening night of Fisherman’s Village on Thursday, May 18, 2023, at Lucky Dime in downtown Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Drive-By Truckers, Allen Stone headline 2024 Fisherman’s Village lineup

Big names and local legends alike are coming to downtown Everett for the music festival from May 16 to 18.

Sen. Patty Murray attends a meeting at the Everett Fire Department’s Station 1 on Thursday, Feb. 22, 2024, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Sen. Murray seeks aid for Snohomish County’s fentanyl, child care crises

The U.S. senator visited Everett to talk with local leaders on Thursday, making stops at the YMCA and a roundtable with the mayor.

Anthony Boggess
Arlington man sentenced for killing roommate who offered shelter

Anthony Boggess, 33, reported hearing the voices of “demons” the night he strangled James Thrower, 65.

Brenda Mann Harrison
Taking care of local news is best done together

The Herald’s journalism development director offers parting thoughts.

Lake Serene in Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service)
How will climate change affect you? New tool gives an educated guess

The Climate Vulnerability Tool outlines climate hazards in Snohomish County — and it may help direct resources.

A cliff above the Pilchuck River shows signs of erosion Friday, Feb. 9, 2024, in Lake Stevens, Washington. Lake Connor Park sits atop the cliff. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Hill erodes in Lake Connor Park, forcing residents of 8 lots to vacate

The park has just under 1,500 members east of Lake Stevens. The riverside hill usually loses 18 inches a year. But it was more this year.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.