Police want to know who shot bald eagle found dead in Oregon

The killing is punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000.

Associated Press

CANYONVILLE, Ore. — Someone shot a bald eagle to death in western Oregon, and the police want to find out who did it.

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife troopers are seeking tips from the public. The troopers responded Wednesday to a report that a bald eagle was seen dead in Lower Cow Creek, in Douglas County. A photo showed the bird face-down in the water. They determined it was shot one to two days before being found.

A reward up to $2,500 is offered for information leading to a conviction.

The killing, or possession of a bald eagle or its parts, is punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000.

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