Julie Muhlstein

Bill Bates, former editor, publisher of Snohomish Tribune, dies

The small-town newspaperman found at midlife a new passion in mountaineering.

A 1907 beauty of a house at 2108 Rucker Ave. in Everett has been restored and renovated into six apartments after sitting empty and in disrepair for 15 years. Its owners now seek listing on the Everett Register of Historic Places.The house is next to the one Everett’s Bill Belshaw renovated in 2012. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Top-to-bottom renovation rejuvenates Rucker home

Contractor takes a historic house and creates six homes in one

A 1907 beauty of a house at 2108 Rucker Ave. in Everett has been restored and renovated into six apartments after sitting empty and in disrepair for 15 years. Its owners now seek listing on the Everett Register of Historic Places.The house is next to the one Everett’s Bill Belshaw renovated in 2012. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Success stories at Cocoon House: Teenagers take wing

The nonprofit celebrated its young residents with Butterfly Awards for their achievements.

Everett’s corner veteran flag-wavers honor one of their own

Evergreen Troop Support Group members turned out to remember Vietnam veteran John McKee, 79.

Longtime Grace United Methodist Church office manager Linda Doyle finds a memento—an intact yellow brick—to remind her of all the good memories here. But Doyle and many church members are excited about Cocoon House’s new home. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

A new generation of good works takes root in Everett

Spirit of Grace United Methodist Church comes down as Cocoon House prepares to build.

Longtime Grace United Methodist Church office manager Linda Doyle finds a memento—an intact yellow brick—to remind her of all the good memories here. But Doyle and many church members are excited about Cocoon House’s new home. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Grief for the planet is real, and students are feeling it

“They’re losing sleep,” says a UW Bothell lecturer. She leads a seminar on environmental anxiety.

Two-day event will offer free medical and dental services

The Amen Everett Free Clinic is expected to serve 400 to 500 patients Friday and Sunday.

Guatemalan villagers join with volunteers from the Hands for Peacemaking Foundation outside the school the Everett-based nonprofit helped build last month in the village of Canton Maya Jaguar. (Larry Jubie photos)

Rotary families put their hearts to work

They join with the Everett-based Hands for Peacemaking Foundation to build a school in Guatemala.

Guatemalan villagers join with volunteers from the Hands for Peacemaking Foundation outside the school the Everett-based nonprofit helped build last month in the village of Canton Maya Jaguar. (Larry Jubie photos)
Ingrid Kanis Steppic, the first of four speakers in EvCC’s annual “Surviving the Holocaust” series, talks about her parents helping hide 40 Jews in The Netherlands during the Nazi occupation and her father warning others not to register but to hide. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

‘These were not nameless people’ being killed by the Nazis

On Holocaust Remembrance Day, those who were there explain horrors that are no longer common knowledge.

Ingrid Kanis Steppic, the first of four speakers in EvCC’s annual “Surviving the Holocaust” series, talks about her parents helping hide 40 Jews in The Netherlands during the Nazi occupation and her father warning others not to register but to hide. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Elizabeth Ruth Wallace on skis in Sun Valley, Idaho, in 1966 with her husband, pharmacist Bryan Wallace. Since her death in 2016, the Elizabeth Ruth Wallace Living Trust has donated millions of dollars to nonprofit groups, parks and other organizations. (Courtesy Cheri Ryan)

Edmonds-area native’s living trust has given away millions

Through her generosity, Elizabeth Ruth “Bette” Wallace’s legacy endures.

Elizabeth Ruth Wallace on skis in Sun Valley, Idaho, in 1966 with her husband, pharmacist Bryan Wallace. Since her death in 2016, the Elizabeth Ruth Wallace Living Trust has donated millions of dollars to nonprofit groups, parks and other organizations. (Courtesy Cheri Ryan)
From left, library historian Lisa Labovitch, Jerry Solie (standing), and history buffs Dave Ramstad and William Vincent (right) enjoy one another’s light conversation while studying images in dozens of scrapbooks and photo albums Tuesday night at the Everett Public Library. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Sleuthing the history and mysteries of a city

Everett Public Library opens its photo albums, scrapbooks to amateur historians

From left, library historian Lisa Labovitch, Jerry Solie (standing), and history buffs Dave Ramstad and William Vincent (right) enjoy one another’s light conversation while studying images in dozens of scrapbooks and photo albums Tuesday night at the Everett Public Library. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Bill Prochnau (right) received an Everett Junior College Distinguished Alumnus Award from then-Herald Publisher Larry Hanson at the college’s Grand Reunion in August 1997. Prochnau, a renowned journalist and author, died March 28 in Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy Larry O’Donnell)

Bill Prochnau chronicled the world — and threw 2 no-hitters

The Everett native is dead at 80 after a distinguished journalism career in Seattle and D.C.

Bill Prochnau (right) received an Everett Junior College Distinguished Alumnus Award from then-Herald Publisher Larry Hanson at the college’s Grand Reunion in August 1997. Prochnau, a renowned journalist and author, died March 28 in Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy Larry O’Donnell)

Locals reflect on the 50 years since MLK’s assassination

Recalls state Rep. John Lovick, the former county executive and sheriff: “I just felt that hope was lost.”

Make-A-Wish kid Jayla Kemp, 11, from Fulton, Missouri, celebrates for a moment before she chooses as much as she wishes Wednesday at Funko in Everett. The “Welcome Jayla” sign is for her, and Make-A-Wish Foundation really did make it happen for this preteen who suffers from cystic fibrosis. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Funko opens its doors to Make-A-Wish recipient

Cystic fibrosis patient Jayla Kemp, 11, and her dad share a routine built around Funko fandom.

Make-A-Wish kid Jayla Kemp, 11, from Fulton, Missouri, celebrates for a moment before she chooses as much as she wishes Wednesday at Funko in Everett. The “Welcome Jayla” sign is for her, and Make-A-Wish Foundation really did make it happen for this preteen who suffers from cystic fibrosis. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Capt. Christopher Vanghele, of the Newtown Police Department in Connecticut, spoke Wednesday at a fundraiser for Victim Support Services. He led the initial entry team at Sandy Hook Elementary School after a mass shooter’s attack in 2012. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

A harrowing talk by a Sandy Hook shooting first responder

Newtown, Connecticut, police Capt. Christopher Vanghele addressed Victim Support Services in Everett.

Capt. Christopher Vanghele, of the Newtown Police Department in Connecticut, spoke Wednesday at a fundraiser for Victim Support Services. He led the initial entry team at Sandy Hook Elementary School after a mass shooter’s attack in 2012. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
A group of about 20 people from the Tulalip Tribes, including three mothers of victims of the 2014 Marysville High School shooting, marched Saturday in Washington, D.C., to protest gun violence. Deborah Parker, a former vice chairwoman of the tribal board of directors, is holding up a sign. (Deborah Parker photo)

United at D.C. march by their own tragedy here at home

Students, parents and tribal members joined the massive call for action on gun control.

A group of about 20 people from the Tulalip Tribes, including three mothers of victims of the 2014 Marysville High School shooting, marched Saturday in Washington, D.C., to protest gun violence. Deborah Parker, a former vice chairwoman of the tribal board of directors, is holding up a sign. (Deborah Parker photo)

She was a graceful partner to Everett’s favorite son

Helen Jackson was remembered Saturday as a woman of spirit and sparkle, warmth and commitment.

‘My princess warrior’ made the most of their short marriage

Heather Absher died of cancer a little more than 10 weeks after marrying Jimmy Absher.

Bill Short, 74, and his sister Pat Veale, 73, attended the old Emander School, which was near what’s now I-5 and 128th Street in south Everett. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Woman wants to commemorate a neighborhood long gone

Pat Veale and her siblings grew up in the Emander area of south Everett.

Bill Short, 74, and his sister Pat Veale, 73, attended the old Emander School, which was near what’s now I-5 and 128th Street in south Everett. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Jim and Marcia Hashman during a visit to the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe in 2014. Jim Hashman, who taught music at Mountlake Terrace High School in the 1980s and ’90s, died Jan. 31, after struggling with ALS for several years. (Herald file)

Despite ALS, he lived his life with joy and purpose

Former Mountlake Terrace High School music teacher Jim Hashman died Jan. 31.

Jim and Marcia Hashman during a visit to the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe in 2014. Jim Hashman, who taught music at Mountlake Terrace High School in the 1980s and ’90s, died Jan. 31, after struggling with ALS for several years. (Herald file)