Candidates agree: Sultan needs more business

  • By Alejandro Dominguez Herald Writer
  • Saturday, October 15, 2011 12:01am
  • Local NewsSultan

SULTAN — Two City Council members will try to keep their seats in the Nov. 8 election against two others who once wanted to disincorporate the city, but now just want to reduce the size of city government.

Incumbent Marianne Naslund is running against candidate Kay George for council positio

n No. 3. Meanwhile, incumbent Joe Neigel is running against candidate Bart Dalmasso for position No. 5.

City council members are paid up to $1,800 a year.

Naslund and Neigel were appointed to the City Council last year. George and Dalmasso were part of a group who wanted to disincorporate the city last year, but the group couldn’t gather enough support. The idea was shelved and they say they’re running independently but both with the goal of making the city government smaller.

Council members Jeffrey Beeler and Sarah Davenport-Smith are running unopposed for two other council seats. Current Mayor Carolyn Eslick is also running unopposed for another term.

City Council Pos. No. 3

George says the city has spent more money on consultants than infrastructure.

George is in favor of joint plan with Monroe and Snohomish to attract outdoor and recreational businesses to the area. She, however, believes that the open market should let that happen, not the government.

“The open market should do that naturally,” George said. “Let capitalism do it, not the government. That’s when things go awry.”

Councilwoman Naslund is concerned about retaining rights to water the city buys from Everett. She wants the process of getting city permits to be easier to understand. Naslund also wants to attract retail and manufacturing jobs to the city. By having jobs nearby and also by promoting people to shop locally, Naslund believes people would drive less and reduce the congestion on U.S. 2.

City Council Pos. No. 5

Candidate Bart Dalmasso said he wants more businesses to set up in Sultan.

“The city is chasing businesses away. I want to attract businesses, especially green business, so Sultan can be more affordable to its citizens,” Dalmasso said.

He is against creating a transportation benefit district, a special taxing entity that would pay for road maintenance, because he doesn’t want people to pay an additional $20 car tab fees. One thing Dalmasso would push for if elected is changing the recycle services so people would pay less, he said. Dalmasso also believes his background as business owner has taught him to make difficult decisions needed in the council.

Councilman Joe Neigel, is also against creating the taxing district because he is against raising taxes.

He said he learned that change takes time and that the council has done a good job in following the process instead of acting on impulses. As he sees it, the biggest problem for the city is keeping infrastructure and level of services up with declining revenue.

“We continue to tighten our belts,” Neigel said.

Alejandro Dominguez: 425-339-3422; adominguez@heraldnet.com.

Sultan City Council

Position 3

Belinda Kay George

Age: 52

Occupation: Cook for a sorority at University of Washington. Former business owner.

Priorities: Reduce local government regulation to help businesses thrive; reduce unnecessary bureaucracy in City Hall; reduce utility fees.

Marianne Naslund

Age: 42

Occupation: Administrative secretary for Sultan School District

Priorities: Streamline the permit process for commercial and residential land use and construction; keep utility bills similar to adjacent cities; make sure money is used to maintain city assets.

Position 5

Bart Dalmasso

Age: 71

Occupation: Real estate broker

Priorities: Find ways to reduce government costs; opposes traffic enforcement cameras; wants to make more people interested in attending council meetings.

Joseph “Joe” Neigel

Age: 35

Occupation: Human services specialist for Snohomish County

Priorities: Eliminate drug use and prevent kids from using drugs; make government work within its means; make government more accessible for all citizens.

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