Olivia Vanni / The Herald
Josh O’Connor, president of Sound Publishing and publisher of The Daily Herald, and Carrie Radcliff, advertising director of The Daily Herald.

Olivia Vanni / The Herald Josh O’Connor, president of Sound Publishing and publisher of The Daily Herald, and Carrie Radcliff, advertising director of The Daily Herald.

Purchase Photo

Sound Publishing offers a new round of advertising grants

Businesses serving Snohomish County can take advantage of the media company’s second assistance program.

EVERETT — Sound Publishing has launched a local stimulus program to help businesses adapt in a rapidly evolving economic environment.

Based in Everett, Sound is the publisher of The Daily Herald, Peninsula Daily News and the Daily World in Aberdeen and provides local news, information and advertising to more than 35 communities in Washington.

Sound will make up to $500,000 available to locally owned and operated businesses through monthly grants ranging from $500 to $20,000.

The program will provide matching advertising credits for use in print and digital products. The grants will be awarded immediately and will be effective in January, February and March.

“This stimulus program follows the highly successful grant program that we launched in May of this year,” said Josh O’Connor, president of Sound Publishing.

“While providing nearly $300,000 of much-needed marketing grants to local advertisers, we gained great insights into the challenges that small business owners are facing,” O’Connor said. “We’ve developed our stimulus program to meet those challenges and help local business not only recover, but flourish, in today’s business climate.”

Applications are due Jan. 4. Grants can be used from Jan. 1 through March 31.

“The goal of the local business stimulus program is to assist our clients and small businesses effectively communicate with their customers, regardless of the external challenges they face,” said Carrie Radcliff, the company’s advertising director.

“The Daily Herald has made significant investments in multi-platform communication technologies that allow our clients to have one-on-one conversations with their customers, which is essential in these business conditions,” Radcliff said.

“We’ve heard from partners big and small how significant the grant program was at a time when they needed it the most,” Radcliff said of the earlier program. “Now it’s time to focus on the future and help them move forward.”

To apply, go to: www.soundcommunitygrant.com

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

A Boeing 787 operated by All Nippon Airways taxis under a rainbow created by fire trucks at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Monday, Oct. 1, 2012, in Seattle, during an official welcome ceremony after it landed on the first day of service for the aircraft on ANA's Seattle-Tokyo route. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Last Everett-built Boeing 787 rolls off the assembly line

Production of the once-hot Dreamliner is being consolidated at the company’s South Carolina plant.

Decarla Stinn, owner of Decarla’s Beauty Supply & Salon in Everett, sews in the first row of extensions on Hope Hottemdorf on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Her short-term plan to run a beauty supply store went awry

Clients wouldn’t let her quit, and Decarla’s Beauty Supply & Salon in Everett is celebrating 17 years in business.

Erin Staadecker (left-right) Jael Weinburg and Kaylee Allen with Rosie formed the Edmonds firm Creative Dementia Collective. The company helps memory care patients and care-givers by providing art, music and other creative therapies. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
This startup offers artful therapy for dementia patients

Creative Dementia Collective uses art and music to help them — and their caregivers.

The nose of the 500th 787 Dreamliner at the assembly plant in Everett on Wednesday morning on September 21, 2016. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
U.S., EU agree to suspend tariffs in Boeing-Airbus dispute

The move eases a 17-year transatlantic dispute over illegal aid to the world’s biggest aircraft makers.

Karuana Gatimu of Snohomish, director of the customer advocacy group at Microsoft Teams Engineering. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Microsoft executive: Tech opportunities for women have grown

The sector hasn’t always been friendly to women or people of color, but it’s getting better, says a Snohomish resident.

Dawn Trudeau (Seattle Storm)
13 years ago this month, they bought the Seattle Storm

Dawn Trudeau and her partners didn’t foresee the challenges — or the championships — that were in store.

Elwin Pittman, 10, plays foosball with Ashley Kiboigo in the game room during a break at Safe Haven Cafe on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Born of the pandemic, this business is a parental reprieve

Ashley Kiboigo’s Safe Haven WiFi Cafe in Everett is a place for kids to study and play.

Decarla Stinn (top left), Karuana Gatimu (top right), Dawn Trudeau (bottom left) and Ashley Kiboigo (bottom right).
Getting down to business during Women’s History Month

There have been great gains over the years, but challenges remain — especially this year.

(Getty Images)
You voted: The best cocktails in Snohomish County

Even during a pandemic, people still have their favorites.

Most Read