Many Snohomish County breweries don’t bottle their product. With mandatory closures, one way to help keep them in business is to call them up and order a growler to go. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Many Snohomish County breweries don’t bottle their product. With mandatory closures, one way to help keep them in business is to call them up and order a growler to go. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Drink This: Grab a growler from your favorite local brewery

As coronavirus closes breweries, distilleries and cideries, curbside pickup options are available.

These are some strange times indeed.

Just two weeks ago, we were joking about “Corona” virus with friends and laughing about hysterical toilet paper hoarders.

Now we’re stuck in our homes, nearly every business is closed and flights are grounded. No one is laughing anymore.

Gov. Jay Inslee on Monday called for the closure of all bars, restaurants, coffee shops and other food and beverage services.

That includes breweries, distilleries and cideries.

In order to “flatten the curve,” help out the health care folks and save lives, this is the right thing to do. That doesn’t mean it’s not going to make for some difficult times for small businesses.

But don’t underestimate the creativity and business acumen of these folks. Crucible Brewing’s owner Shawn Dowling emailed me details about a Growler/Crowler to-go program, curbside pick-up options and even the ability for customers to text in an order and swing by to pick it up all without leaving their car.

“This is going to be a tough time for the industry, but I believe that we can weather the storm and all get through this together,” Dowling said.

Foggy Noggin owner Jim Jamison informed me that they’ll be postponing their 10th anniversary party originally scheduled for later this month, as well as the tasting event they had scheduled for this weekend. In the meantime, Jamison said they’ll be offering growler fills and bottles to go.

In The Shadow’s Cole Rinehardt said that Friday was one of the brewery’s busiest days since reopening last year, but that he’ll be closing his doors for now and offering growler fills to go.

“People want to get together and talk about it with their friends,” Rinehardt said. “They want to share their fears and concerns with each other, and a local brewery is a great spot to do just that.

“But it seems closure is the only real way to keep people apart. And I hate it.”

Here are some ways we can help keep these small businesses alive:

Grab a growler or crowler to go. Many of the small breweries in Snohomish County don’t bottle their product. So to help them keep their craft beer moving, if they allow, call them up, order a growler or crowler and pick it up at the brewery. They get a sale and you get delicious beer. Win-win.

Buy up their off-premise beer. Grocery stores remain open, so if you see a local brewery’s product on the shelves, buy it. That’s what I plan to do. No more out-of-region beer for me. I’m going to my local grocery store today and picking up Scuttlebutt, Diamond Knot or whatever other local brewery’s beer I can find.

Support them on social media. You might not be able to shake hands and congratulate a brewer on his creation, but you can send out some love on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Right now is a great time to share a picture of a beer you’re enjoying at home and tell the brewers how much you appreciate their work.

Buy gift certificates. For some breweries, stopping by for a beer or a to-go growler is impossible. But see if you can purchase a gift certificate. It infuses some cash in the business and gives you a goal to reach when this is all over.

Check www.heraldnet.com/hopsandsips for a list of Snohomish County breweries, distilleries and cideries that will be providing services during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Talk to us

More in Life

Even if you haven’t watered your landscape in the past 100 days, or watered very little, get outside and give your plants a good soak. (Getty Images)
It’s dry out there, so water your yard — please!

After 100 days of no precipitation, your garden badly needs a drink. So grab a hose and get to work — it’s well worth the slightly higher water bills.

The all-new Kia Sportage X-Pro model comes standard with all-terrain tires and 17-inch matte black off-road wheels. (Kia)
2023 Kia Sportage has two new models aimed at the outdoorsy

The X-Pro and X-Pro Prestige have all-terrain tires, all-wheel drive, and all kinds of ground clearance.

Women came from all over the Pacific Northwest to “glamp” and raise money to send girls to Girl Scout Camp from Sept. 16-18. The next opportunity to glamp at Camp River Ranch will be Sept. 8-10, 2023. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Women’s glamping retreat raises money to send local girls to camp

I’ve been the camper, the counselor, the Girl Scout leader and the mom. Now, I was the glamper.

Abelia 'Edward Goucher' (Richie Steffen)
Great Plant Pick: Abelia ‘Edward Goucher’

This shrub blooms from summer to late autumn, which will make the pollinators happy.

What does it mean to be a purveyor of public power?

Next week, The Snohomish County PUD and utilities across the country will celebrate Public Power Week.

This quilt features an American flag with 36 stars, indicating that it was made about 1865. Most antique quilts are harder to date.
Tips for estimating an unsigned vintage quilt’s true age

If you can see dark spots in the quilt when held up to a strong light or sunny window, they may be cotton seeds. Some collectors claim that this means the quilt was made before the invention of the cotton gin in 1793.

Making your own WM truck costume takes only a few supplies and can be recycled when you’re done with it. (Courtesy Waste Management)
Green is the new orange: sustainable Halloween celebrations

Spooky season is here: costumes line the shelves at department stores, and… Continue reading

People stroll along Edinburgh’s Royal Mile, one of Europe’s most interesting historic walks, as Edinburgh Castle looms in the distance. (Rick Steves' Europe)
Edinburgh, the cultural heart of Scotland, packs a cultural punch

Once a medieval powerhouse, it is today one of Europe’s most lively and festive cities.

Dan Neumeyer peers out the window of his Hummingbird Yurt. (David Welton)
Otherworldly structures constructed on Whidbey Island

The small buildings — yurts, with a Western twist — were built by Earth dweller Dan Neumeyer.

Most Read