Many Snohomish County breweries don’t bottle their product. With mandatory closures, one way to help keep them in business is to call them up and order a growler to go. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Many Snohomish County breweries don’t bottle their product. With mandatory closures, one way to help keep them in business is to call them up and order a growler to go. (Andy Bronson / Herald file)

Drink This: Grab a growler from your favorite local brewery

As coronavirus closes breweries, distilleries and cideries, curbside pickup options are available.

These are some strange times indeed.

Just two weeks ago, we were joking about “Corona” virus with friends and laughing about hysterical toilet paper hoarders.

Now we’re stuck in our homes, nearly every business is closed and flights are grounded. No one is laughing anymore.

Gov. Jay Inslee on Monday called for the closure of all bars, restaurants, coffee shops and other food and beverage services.

That includes breweries, distilleries and cideries.

In order to “flatten the curve,” help out the health care folks and save lives, this is the right thing to do. That doesn’t mean it’s not going to make for some difficult times for small businesses.

But don’t underestimate the creativity and business acumen of these folks. Crucible Brewing’s owner Shawn Dowling emailed me details about a Growler/Crowler to-go program, curbside pick-up options and even the ability for customers to text in an order and swing by to pick it up all without leaving their car.

“This is going to be a tough time for the industry, but I believe that we can weather the storm and all get through this together,” Dowling said.

Foggy Noggin owner Jim Jamison informed me that they’ll be postponing their 10th anniversary party originally scheduled for later this month, as well as the tasting event they had scheduled for this weekend. In the meantime, Jamison said they’ll be offering growler fills and bottles to go.

In The Shadow’s Cole Rinehardt said that Friday was one of the brewery’s busiest days since reopening last year, but that he’ll be closing his doors for now and offering growler fills to go.

“People want to get together and talk about it with their friends,” Rinehardt said. “They want to share their fears and concerns with each other, and a local brewery is a great spot to do just that.

“But it seems closure is the only real way to keep people apart. And I hate it.”

Here are some ways we can help keep these small businesses alive:

Grab a growler or crowler to go. Many of the small breweries in Snohomish County don’t bottle their product. So to help them keep their craft beer moving, if they allow, call them up, order a growler or crowler and pick it up at the brewery. They get a sale and you get delicious beer. Win-win.

Buy up their off-premise beer. Grocery stores remain open, so if you see a local brewery’s product on the shelves, buy it. That’s what I plan to do. No more out-of-region beer for me. I’m going to my local grocery store today and picking up Scuttlebutt, Diamond Knot or whatever other local brewery’s beer I can find.

Support them on social media. You might not be able to shake hands and congratulate a brewer on his creation, but you can send out some love on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Right now is a great time to share a picture of a beer you’re enjoying at home and tell the brewers how much you appreciate their work.

Buy gift certificates. For some breweries, stopping by for a beer or a to-go growler is impossible. But see if you can purchase a gift certificate. It infuses some cash in the business and gives you a goal to reach when this is all over.

Check www.heraldnet.com/hopsandsips for a list of Snohomish County breweries, distilleries and cideries that will be providing services during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Talk to us

More in Life

Trillium: Playing with the editing features on your phone can create interesting effects, like in this trillium photo. (Jessi Loerch)
How to take great on-trail photos with your phone

Today’s smartphones have sophisticated cameras and picture-taking controls. Here’s how to get the most out of them.

A pit stop in Forks to see the trucks from the Twilight franchise is fun when traveling with teenagers on the Olympic Peninsula. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Traveling with teenagers isn’t so easy-breezy as she thought

The new challenge: Now mom can count on her hand how many vacations they have left as a family.

Dr. Paul on the five signs you’ve been a successful parent

If your adult kids are struggling right now — does that mean that you didn’t do a good job? Absolutely not!

Is she out of luck on this Irish tour refund?

When Susan Danner cancels her Ireland tour after the COVID-19 outbreak, the operator promises a prompt refund. That was a year ago. Where’s her money?

Red osier dogwood  (Cornus sericea (stolonifera)) berries, leaves and twigs.
Red twig dogwoods — there’s variety of shrub for all seasons

Here are four new varieties of twig dogwoods on the market that provide fall and winter interest.

Josey Wise puts out one of the hundreds of glass pumpkins on a display at the Schack Art Center for the upcoming Schack-toberfest on Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021 in Everett, Washington. The festival runs from Sept, 23 to Nov. 6. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Glowing gourds light up Schack-toberfest in Everett this fall

You can see more than 1,000 of the glass pumpkins, and even make your own. Plus, check out The Artists’ Garage Sale on Sept. 25.

Plant "Mount Vernon" as a low informal bed border or small hedge, or as a groundcover under trees and large shrubs.(Rick Peterson)
Great Plant Pick: Prunus laurocerasus ‘Mount Vernon,’ dwarf English laurel

Plant “Mount Vernon” as a low informal bed border or small hedge, or as a groundcover under trees and large shrubs.

This rare Louisiana Creole Gros Rouge punkah from the late 18th-early 19th century made of Southern Yellow Pine with mortise-and-tenon construction, 40 1/2 by 35 inches, was estimated to sell for $10,000 to $15,000 at Neal Auctions, but it didn't sell. (Cowles Syndicate Inc.)
Strange antique made from Southern yellow pine is a punkah

It was the “air conditioner” of the early 19th century. A man called a “punkah wallah” pulled a cord to make it swing back and forth like a fan.

Most Read