‘Fuddy Meers’: You’ll remember this black comedy at Edmonds theater

  • By Theresa Goffredo Herald Writer
  • Thursday, June 3, 2010 12:13pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

“Fuddy Meers”: Director Eric Lewis calls this comedy by David Lindsay-Abaire “wildly funny but also extremely dark.” In short, hard to explain, but hilarious.

Lewis directs this Phoenix Theatre production about a woman named Claire who finds the fact that she has a rare form of amnesia that erases her memory whenever she goes to sleep “very inconvenient.”

Though her loving husband gives her the Cliff notes to her life each morning, certain missing details of Claire’s past are slowly revealed in other ways, such as when the half-blind, half-deaf man in a ski mask pops out from under her bed and claims to be her brother.

“Fuddy Meers” opens at 8 tonight at The Phoenix Theatre, 9673 Firdale Ave., Edmonds. Shows are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through June 27.

Tickets are $18 and $15. Call 206-533-2000 or www.brownpapertickets.com.

“Menopause, The Musical”: This is a G4Productions performance of a show that pokes fun at the not-so-funny things that happen during a woman’s so-called “silent passage.”

The story line follows four women who meet at a lingerie sale and who share nothing in common but a black lace bra and the symptoms of menopause: memory loss, hot flashes and night sweats, according to press material about the show.

Along with sharing their stories of suffering and not enough sex or too much sex, the women carry on against a backdrop of tunes parodying hits from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s such as “Puff, My God I’m Draggin’” and “Stayin’ Awake, Stayin’ Awake.”

“Menopause, the Musical” will be performed at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N., Edmonds. Tickets are $39 and $49.50. Call 425-275-9595 or go to www.ec4arts.org.

“The Cider House Rules, Part One: Here in St. Cloud”: This adaptation of John Irving’s novel lays bare the touchy issues of abortion and abandonment.

The plot focuses on the main character, Homer Wells, who grows up in a Maine orphanage. Homer is cared for and then tutored in the science of gynecology by the orphan’s director, Dr. Wilbur Larch, who warns Homer that he may disapprove, but he can’t be ignorant or look away.

“The Cider House Rules” was the first full-length novel adapted in the Book-It Style and premiered in 1996 at Seattle Repertory Theatre, according to press material about the production.

“The Cider House Rules, Part One: Here in St. Cloud” opens with previews at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Book-It Repertory Theatre, 305 Harrison St., Seattle. Shows are 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through July 11. Tickets start at $20. Call 206-216-0833 or go to

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