Built to Spill, fronted by Doug Martsch, will perform at the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. The event is set for Sept. 9-11. (Associated Press)

Built to Spill, fronted by Doug Martsch, will perform at the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. The event is set for Sept. 9-11. (Associated Press)

Lineup set for Everett Fisherman’s Village Music Festival

Indie rockers Built to Spill will perform at this year’s in-person event, scheduled for Sept. 9-11.

EVERETT — Built to Spill will perform at this year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival.

The festival lineup was released June 15 by the Everett Music Initiative. The event, scheduled for Sept. 9-11 in downtown Everett, will feature more than 30 acts whose music spans many genres.

Festival wristbands — the 21-and-older tickets are $89 each for three days of live music — are available online at www.everettmusicinitiative.org and www.thefishermansvillage.com. There are also Friday only, Saturday only and VIP tickets.

Bonus: If you’re one of the first 250 Fisherman’s fans to purchase the three-day wristbands, you’ll receive a free Funko Pop.

This year’s performance venues will be Tony V’s Garage, the Schack Art Center and First Presbyterian Church, among others.

The Night Market — which features food trucks, a beer garden, and artist and artisan booths — will be back this year. Admission to the market, between Wall Street and Hewitt, will be free and open to all ages.

Built to Spill is an indie rock band fronted by Doug Martsch, who is the only member who’s still with the band since forming it in 1992. The current members of the Boise, Idaho-based band are Martsch on lead vocals and guitar, Melanie Radford on bass and Teresa Esquerra on drums.

“I have probably reached out to Built to Spill — or at least mentioned that we should try to get Built to Spill — almost every single year,” said Ryan Crowther, founder of the festival. “It’s a really big deal to get Built to Spill, because we’ve tried so many times.”

After seven years, most of us thought we knew what to expect. The Fisherman’s Village Music Festival will be held in May. It will feature around 60 national, regional and local acts. It will draw up to 5,000 fans to a number of stages in downtown Everett.

But when COVID-19 hit, the Fisherman’s Village fest as we know it was canceled. The seventh, and now the eighth, annual festivals have had to be adapted to the pandemic.

Last year’s festival, held in October, was presented in four episodes you could watch on your TV or laptop. It featured a mix of 12 bands from the Everett area. All of the performances were pre-recorded on just one stage.

This year’s festival, postponed until September, while following COVID-19 rules and regulations, will have two outdoor stages on Wetmore Avenue to make for a safer event.

“We’re just so excited to have the festival,” Crowther said. “We’ve all had a crazy and unpredictable year — and the opportunity to put a festival on is really exciting. With so much unpredictability around people’s comfort levels, more mandates, etc. we just wanted to make sure we created an event that was manageable — that would work no matter what happens.”

Watch for another Fisherman’s Village Music Festival announcement. Crowther expects to add to the lineup as Washington opens back up.

In addition to Built to Spill, here’s the list of who’s playing at the festival:

Returning performers include Bad Optics, Black Belt Eagle Scout, Black Ends, Clothing Optional, I WILL KEEP YOUR GHOST, Iska Dhaaf, Jason Webley, Mount Eerie, Oliver Elf Army, Spirit Award, Steel Beans, SYLVI and The Grizzled Mighty.

Assertion, led by Foo Fighters drummer William Goldsmith, is among the more than 30 bands slated to perform at the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. (Assertion)

Assertion, led by Foo Fighters drummer William Goldsmith, is among the more than 30 bands slated to perform at the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in Everett. (Assertion)

Assertion is a new band formed by William Goldsmith, the drummer for Sunny Day Real Estate and Foo Fighters. The band, which includes members Justin Tamminga on vocals and guitar and Bryan Gorder on bass, recently released its debut album “Intermission.”

Blood Lemon features guitarist Lisa Simpson, bassist Melanie Radford and percussionist Lindsey Lloyd. The Boise band formed after the trio realized they all loved a cover band called Mostly Muff, Kim Deal of Pixies and Breeders fame and ’90s Riot Grrrl music.

Enumclaw, a rock band that’s actually from Tacoma, has been getting a lot of buzz from KEXP, Pitchfork, The Fader and Stereogum. The band, which formed in 2019, is made up of frontman Aramis Johnson, Nathan Cornell on guitar, Ladaniel Gipson on drums and Eli Edwards on bass.

Enumclaw is made up of frontman Aramis Johnson, Nathan Cornell on guitar, Ladaniel Gipson on drums and Eli Edwards on bass. (Raphael Gaultier)

Enumclaw is made up of frontman Aramis Johnson, Nathan Cornell on guitar, Ladaniel Gipson on drums and Eli Edwards on bass. (Raphael Gaultier)

J-Key is an Everett rapper whose single “Crazy” has been streamed more than 100,000 times on YouTube. Also known as Jay Key, J-Key has collaborated with Pac Div, Glasses Malone and the late Nipsey Hussle.

Lady A is the stage name of Seattle blues singer Anita White. She was nominated as Best Blues Performer of the Year 2020 by the Washington Blues Society.

Marshall Law Band was the house band for Black Lives Matter protests in Seattle. The band was inspired by the street demonstrations that followed the murder of George Floyd to record “12th & Pine.” Members include rapper Marshall Hugh, Marty Thordarson on saxophone, Evan Robertson on bass, Matt McAlman on drums, Josh Richins on guitar and Zack Olson on keys.

Nite Wave is Bothell’s own new wave cover band. Nite Wave has opened for Billy Idol and shared the stage with Jane Wiedlin of The Go-Go’s, 1980s icon Tiffany and Clive Farrington of When in Rome. Frontman Michael Henrichsen is joined by Evan Galt on bass, Dave Dodge on guitar, Jim Simbe on keyboard and Jeff Mills on drums.

Prism Bitch is an Albuquerque, New Mexico, quartet featuring Lauren Poole on bass, Lilah Rose on keys and guitar, Chris Walsh on guitar and Teresa Cruces on drums. Poole, Rose and Cruces also sing in the hard rock band.

Quinn Deveaux is an R&B, soul and funk singer-songwriter from Oakland, California. He has shared the stage with Kool & the Gang, Aaron Neville, Taj Mahal, War and Bobby Bare Jr.

Rio Chanae, from Seattle, is a neo-soul singer-songwriter and ranked the 12th spoken word poet in the world.

Others include Jango, Jaws of Brooklyn, Kassi Valazza, Kween Kaysh, La Witch, Night Heron, Shaina Shepherd, True Loves and Ya Tseen.

Sara Bruestle: 425-339-3046; sbruestle@heraldnet.com; @sarabruestle.

If you go

Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, hosted by the Everett Music Initiative, is scheduled for Sept. 9-11. More than 30 bands will perform in downtown Everett. Festival wristbands are $85. Friday only, Saturday only and VIP tickets also available. More at www.thefishermansvillage.com.

Also: Everett Music Initiative’s Fourth of July concert is scheduled for 5 to 10:15 p.m. at Boxcar Park, 1200 Millwright Loop West, Everett. The lineup is Nite Wave (’80s new wave), Petty or Not (Tom Petty tribute) and Road Trip (’70s to ’90s hits). There will be a beer garden, food trucks and a fireworks show. Tickets are $30 in advance or $40 at the door. More at www.everettmusicinitiative.com.

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