Arlington City Council. (Arlington Times, file)

Arlington City Council. (Arlington Times, file)

9 candidates apply to fill Arlington City Council vacancy

The successful appointee will fill Josh Roundy’s remaining term, which expires December 2022.

By Douglas Buell / The Arlington Times

ARLINGTON – Nine applicants are looking to join the Arlington City Council, filling in for Josh Roundy, who resigned last month for personal reasons.

The council is reviewing the applications, and will interview the nominees at 5 p.m. Feb. 19 in the City Council Chambers, 238 N. Olympic Ave.

The appointee will fill Roundy’s remaining term, which expires in December 2022, and would need to run for office to retain it.

City officials hope to seat the successful nominee by March 2, but have until April 11 if necessary.

The applicants are:

Tracy Cuajao — A business consultant and entrepreneur. He serves on the board for the Community Health Centers of Snohomish County, and formerly on the county’s Chemical Dependency and Mental Health Advisory Board and Council on Aging. He was born into poverty in San Francisco and was the first in his family to graduate from college, earning a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration and master’s degree in Organizational Development.

Mark Tingley — Development specialist with the Housing Authority of Snohomish County. He is enrolled in the Sustainable Transportation graduate certificate program through the University of Washington to gain more knowledge on transportation and investments in the region. He supports better connections for all modes of transportation, the Complete Streets program, mixed-use and mixed-income tenancy, more public spaces, private-public partnerships and creating more opportunities for disadvantaged communities to engage in public service.

Gary William Bernard — Paraeducator with the Arlington School District Transitions Program and sometimes usher in the Byrnes Performing Arts Center. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English Education from Brigham Young University. He served as a student body representative in college. The 10-year resident also sees the need to balance growth and connectedness with a hometown feel, while ensuring opportunities for accessible education and recreation.

Holly Sloan-Buchanan — Retired from the Army Nurse Corps in 1996 after 23 years filling various positions. She earned a master’s degree in Nursing Administration from the University of Washington. She has been a regular audience member at City Council meetings. Her leadership and community service includes being a Volunteer Chaplain for the police and fire departments and Cascade Valley Hospital; fundraising for the BPAC (arts center), serving on the Cocoon House board including two years as president, and Arlington Dollars for Scholars. She supports managed growth, new business, housing, transportation, and fire and police department programs.

Brad Sibley — Having grown up in a large city and being active duty Navy for as long as he has, Sibley much prefers smaller towns. As a permanent resident of Arlington now, he has the time to become involved in the City Council. Sibley applauds the city’s leaders, but he has some ideas for improvements. Through his Navy supervisory and civilian jobs and having lived in many parts of the country and Europe, he touts diplomatic skills and different perspectives that could prove useful.

Robert Cosgrove Jr. — Cosgrove is a blue-collar worker for a local company, studying at Everett Community College to become a machinist, and keeping involved in local politics as a Precinct Committee Officer for the 39th Legislative District. Cosgrove sees serving on the City Council as a way to make a positive impact in his community. Issues important to him include sustainable growth in Arlington, public safety, roadways and infrastructure, homelessness and addiction and fiscal responsibility.

Heather Logan — Logan began working in Arlington in 1994. Over the next 22 years, she worked in various administrative roles at the local public hospital, retired in 2016, then un-retired to work 15 months for the City of Arlington. Now she is a consultant helping the cities of Arlington and Marysville meet their social services goals. Logan views Arlington as being on the cusp of major change; she wants to help craft a future that honors small town roots and preserves downtown charm, while embracing one that will produce both newcomers and jobs. Her community involvement includes the Chamber of Commerce, Cascade Valley Health Foundation, Housing Hope, Arlington Dollars for Scholars and Leadership Snohomish County.

Avery Hufford — Hufford worked for the Stafne Law Firm in Arlington and attended many City Council meetings to gain a deeper perspective on local politics and the community’s needs. Hufford was also involved with the Downtown Arlington Business Association, served on multiple political campaigns, and is currently getting a new business started. The millennial has encouraged other young people to become more engaged in government and public policy. A key issue of Hufford’s is housing. He thinks the city needs to keep costs low and find ways to keep Arlington an optimal place to live for all residents, especially children and the elderly.

Don Vanney — Born and raised in Arlington, the retired purchasing agent/manager from Senior Aerospace-AMT ran a strong campaign for mayor in November, falling just a few votes short. He hopes to serve the community where he was raised. Vanney is another frequent attendee at City Council meetings, and up to speed on many issues. His key concerns are addressing current growth, and taking care of infrastructure and other future needs.

The Arlington Times is a sibling publication of The Daily Herald.

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