Republicans to challenge 1st District Democrats

State Rep. Luis Moscoso faces a challenge from businessman Ed Barton, who had registered with the State Public Disclosure Commission as a Libertarian but later changed his party preference to Republican.

State Rep. Derek Stanford’s first announced opponent is Republican Brian Travis, who ran in the 2012 primary but lost to fellow Republican Sandy Guinn. He had lost bids for places on the Alderwood Water and Wastewater District Board in 2009 and 2011.

The two Democratic incumbents and two Republican challengers have registered their candidacy with the Public Disclosure Commission, a step that allows them to raise and spend money for the August primary and November general election.

Candidates file May 12-16 for positions on the August primary ballot. Candidates in the 1st Legislative District, and any legislative or congressional district that crosses into more than one county, file either on the secretary of state’s web site or in person at the secretary of state’s office in Olympia. State and county elections officially began accepting mail registration Monday, April 28, but don’t record them until filing week.

The two Democratic incumbents start the campaign with big financial advantages Moscoso has reported raising $29,078 and spending $17,296. Stanford reports raising $16,711 and spending $682. Neither Republican challenger has reported any fundraising or spending. Travis reported no fundraising in any of his earlier campaigns.

Both Moscoso and Stanford first won election in 2010, when Moscoso replaced Democrat Mark Ericks, who had resigned to become U.S. Marshal for Western Washington, and Stanford replaced retired Democratic Rep. Al O’Beien.

In 2012, Stanford defeated Republican Guinn by a 58 percent to 42 percent margin, and Moscoso defeated Mark Davies, who appeared on the ballot with no party preference but had the backing of district Republican organizations in both Snohomish and King counties, by 61 percent to 39 percent.

The 1st Legislative District includes most of Mountlake Terrace, all of Brier and Bothell, unincorporated areas of Snohomish County north and east of Bothell, part of Kirkland and unincorporated areas of King County between Bothell and Kirkland.

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